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corporallouis
09-17-2009, 01:46 PM
Just found this forum through another. Not many Canadian ones here at all. My first contribution to the forums is a shot I took of the Louisbourg lighthouse shoreline with a new B+W filter. It's a 10 stop filter that allows me long exposures in bright daylight as I'm sure most of you know already.

Greg_Nuspel
09-17-2009, 01:50 PM
Very nice shot, the treatment is well done.

kat
09-17-2009, 02:09 PM
Very nice shot, the treatment is well done.

:clap::D

welcome!

tomorrowstreasures
09-17-2009, 02:22 PM
Just found this forum through another. Not many Canadian ones here at all. My first contribution to the forums is a shot I took of the Louisbourg lighthouse shoreline with a new B+W filter. It's a 10 stop filter that allows me long exposures in bright daylight as I'm sure most of you know already.
Is the filter a polarizer filter or a neutral density filter? what is the name of the filter? i love the effects of it! Lovely image!

corporallouis
09-17-2009, 02:40 PM
Hi. It's a B+W ND3.0 filter. It's a neutral Density filter that allows you to slow down your shutter speed by 10 stops. It's a little tedious photographing with it. You have to focus and meter without the filter on. Then switch to manual focus or lock your focus, attach the filter and then do the long exposure required usually with bulb setting. There are charts out there or there's the math work to calculate your exposures properly. Most will set the ISO to 100 and stop down to f/14 or so and use a chart to give exposure times. An example is with your ISO and f-stop selected (and your metering done) would be if you had an exposure of 1/125 sec ( using ISO 100 and f/14 ) calculate 1/125 X 1000 (10 stops) = 1000 over 125 and then divide = 8 seconds . . your exposure. Simple eh . . . Hope this made sense. Here's a link to a very good reputable supplier I buy all my filters from: http://www.2filter.com/prices/products/bwnd.html

kat
09-17-2009, 02:49 PM
I didn't know there was a chart!!! Trying to find it online now..and more to that! I purchased one last month and this info would be handy!!!!

But I'm a bit of a blonde when it comes to info.. :p

corporallouis
09-17-2009, 03:12 PM
Kat . . print this off or write it down and stuff it with your filter.

1/8000 = 1/8
1/4000 = 1/4
1/1000 = 1/2
1/500 = 2
1/250 = 4 .
1/125 = 8
1/60 = 16
1/30 = 30
1/15 = 60
1/8 = 120
1/4 = 240
1/2 = 480
1 = 960
2= 1920
4 = 384

First column is your meter reading using NO FILTER. The second column is the adjusted exposure you need to use.

kat
09-17-2009, 03:30 PM
Ok. Just doing some research and boy am I off. I havet he hoya ND4 filter that does 2 stops (although for soem reason I thought it did 4).

So in that equation..would I use 200 instead of 1000?

tomorrowstreasures
09-17-2009, 04:01 PM
corporallouis:thankyou:

7 posts in and you have taught some of us some neat information already!!!!

thank you so much for taking the time to do that!
Susan

corporallouis
09-17-2009, 04:53 PM
Thank you, but that was nothing at all. I've been at this photography stuff since 1967 and have made more mistakes over the years. But the big thing is that I learned from them. :lightbulb And I have found that the more I learn the less I know. There are some brilliant folks on these forums and most are only too willing to share what knowledge they've gained over the years. I'm only new here and haven't had too much time to get a "feel" for the forum yet. I hope I can help people in any which way I can. I also hope I can learn from some here. I've seen some terrific work being produced during a quick tour of the site. I have a Flickr site I throw all my junk in so that family and friends can see what's going on in my world. I'm not sure if it's okay to post links like that in here, so I'll refrain from that and enjoy the rest of the show you good folks are putting on . . .

corporallouis
09-17-2009, 04:58 PM
I believe that should work for you okay. I find that it's just a starting off point anyway. After a few test runs, I think you will find the right combination. I usually shoot a lot of my shots using the chart and some a little shorter and longer than the actual chart shows. One thing you will find with a lot of these ND filters is that you'll have to do some white balance adjustments in post processing. They usually leave a distinct pinkish cast, but that's the nature of the beast.

casil403
09-17-2009, 11:17 PM
Beautiful image and welcome! :)

Marko
09-18-2009, 11:37 AM
Welcome corporallouis! Your images are making quite an impression:highfive:
We love to share and learn around here so it looks like you'll fit in just fine. :goodvibes

Thanks for sharing your ND info. I used to walk around with a dark red filter when I shot B/W film so your dark and poppy skies are bringing back memories.....

Feel free to mention your flickr page or add it in your sig.

Marko

corporallouis
09-18-2009, 11:59 AM
Thank you for such a warm reception. I belong to quite a number of photography forums on the net. I don't normally post too much on most of them. They're like sharks in a feeding frenzy. They'll chew you up and spit you out just for the fun. Constructive criticism is one thing, but on some of the forums it's downright nasty. I "think" most of us are hobby shooters and not into serious commercial work and as such like to get a pat on the back for showing photos of our little part of the world. I have my share of scars on my back from some folks on the forums. All you get is "if you did this and that rock wasn't there yadda yadda yadda." I would be physically impossible to get a photo without reconstructing the landscape for some of these folks. I like it simple. If someone likes my photo that's good. If not, be gentle and tell me why not without tearing flesh off or just don't comment and move along. Civility is sure lacking in places on here for sure. I get a sense that's not the case here, and I hope we can all play nicely together . . and sorry for the semi-rant ;)