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View Full Version : Can't judge a violinist by it's violin



tomorrowstreasures
10-13-2009, 10:13 AM
This was sent to me in an email, so i could not properly link it, but thought it merited being shared. A very, very powerful message it sent to me. Would love to know the impact it has on you!
Susan

4573



Washington, DC Metro Station on a cold January morning. A man with a violin plays six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time approx. 2 thousand people passed through the station, most of them on their way to work. After 3 minutes a middle-aged man noticed there was a musician playing. He slowed his pace and stopped for a few seconds and then hurried to meet his schedule.

4 minutes later:

The violinist received his first dollar: a woman threw the money in the hat and, without stopping, continued to walk.

6 minutes:

A young man leaned against the wall to listen to him, then looked at his watch and started to walk again.

10 minutes:

A 3-year old boy stopped but his mother tugged him along hurriedly. The kid stopped to look at the violinist again, but the mother pushed hard and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. Every parent, without exception, forced their children to move on quickly.

45 minutes:

The musician played continuously. Only 6 people stopped and listened for a short while. About 20 gave money but continued to walk at their normal pace. The man collected a total of $32.

1 hour:

He finished playing and silence took over. No one noticed. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the greatest musicians in the world. He played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, with a violin valued at $3.5 million dollars. Two days before, Joshua Bell sold out a theatre in Boston where the price of seats averaged $100.

This is a true story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste and people's priorities. The questions raised: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour, do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize talent in an unexpected context?

One possible conclusion reached from this experiment could be this: If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world, playing some of the finest music ever written, with one of the most beautiful instruments ever made... what else are we missing?

LINK (WITH SOME VIDEO) ADDED BY ADMIN - http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/04/AR2007040401721.html

kat
10-13-2009, 10:50 AM
Wonderful thread tt! Definitely makes one ponder!

Marko
10-13-2009, 12:38 PM
VERY intriguing thread TT - It causes you to think quite a bit.

We all have so much BS constantly churning in our heads that it's really hard to hear the music, even when it's being played by a master. Only kids have the time to marvel at the magic whenever it happens. Adults are too busy thinking about mortgages/work/responsibilities.

Thx for sharing!!

Marko

JAS_Photo
10-13-2009, 12:57 PM
Cool stuff! I guess people have a tendency to devalue things because of their context.

Greg_Nuspel
10-13-2009, 02:55 PM
Here's an experiment, next time there is a stunning sunrise or the moon is on the horizon while on the way to work, ask your fellow workers what they thought of it. Bet you most didn't notice it.

casil403
10-13-2009, 04:01 PM
I have to wonder...how many people walked past him with their heads down furiously texting into their Blackberry or cellphone while wearing earbuds connected to their IPod?

I've seen alot of that lately and it really disturbs me.....people just don't connect with people anymore...kinda sad really. :yell:

Greg_Nuspel
10-13-2009, 04:09 PM
I have to wonder...how many people walked past him with their heads down furiously texting into their Blackberry or cellphone while wearing earbuds connected to their IPod?

I've seen alot of that lately and it really disturbs me.....people just don't connect with people anymore...kinda sad really. :yell:

The parent with their kids at the zoo and a cellphone permanently attached to their ear. :wall-an:

tomorrowstreasures
10-13-2009, 06:32 PM
points well taken. to add, how about the growing "at risk" population that educators have to deal with everyday, not to mention tax payers and society in general. to me, it such a no brainer. open your eyes. seize the moment. the tiniest things in life are what our children hang on to forever.

Mad Aussie
10-13-2009, 09:16 PM
Don't just look ... 'SEE.' Don't just listen ... 'HEAR.' Don't just touch ...'FEEL.'

Iguanasan
10-13-2009, 09:25 PM
I almost didn't slow to "listen" to this. I find that I now that I'm hauling a camera around everywhere looking for that next shot that I see a lot more than I used to see.

Very cool post. Thanks for sharing!