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View Full Version : The Beaver Damn in Progress



casil403
10-16-2009, 11:34 PM
Pretty much have the whole creek done now...they will start building it up next!

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2706/4017547149_4752270b11_o.jpg

Mad Aussie
10-17-2009, 12:30 AM
Wow ... they lay down rock first???

Greg_Nuspel
10-17-2009, 06:59 AM
I was surprised by this as well when I first saw it, I guess they know what is required for a good foundation.

web44
10-18-2009, 03:18 PM
Interesting photo, I'm not a subject slave, if you show vision, I'm on your side, that said, consider getting rid of the top river detail completely , you may end up with a more powerful graphic image.

casil403
10-18-2009, 03:31 PM
Interesting photo, I'm not a subject slave, if you show vision, I'm on your side, that said, consider getting rid of the top river detail completely , you may end up with a more powerful graphic image.

Cool.... thanks W44 I looked your suggestion by scrolling and you are right. :)

Man o man.... I was there today form the other side of the creek and you get a real sense of how much they've dammed it up if you go form the south side! They've built it up considerably since I was last there!!
I find it really quite fascinating!:)

Jake_And123
10-18-2009, 04:11 PM
Nice curve and composition!

zenon5940
10-18-2009, 07:10 PM
Nice composition Casil. I like the way beavers Know that curved lines in a dam will make it much more stable. Humans did it for the Confederation bridge between PEI and New-Brunswick.

Mad Aussie
10-18-2009, 07:25 PM
... curved lines in a dam will make it much more stable.
I didn't know this? I wonder how that works?

Greg_Nuspel
10-18-2009, 07:30 PM
I didn't know this? I wonder how that works?

It's because they're dam smart

Mad Aussie
10-18-2009, 07:42 PM
It's because they're dam smart
:laugh:


I need a REAL engineer :headslap:

Bambi
10-18-2009, 08:13 PM
because the arch pushes the water to the sides. this results in the forces compressing the dam in on its own structure which makes it stronger.


ok?

Mad Aussie
10-18-2009, 08:46 PM
sounds kinda feasible. Although I'm not sure how water, that levels itself, will apply more pressure to the outsides of the dam.

Mad Aussie
10-18-2009, 08:50 PM
Just had a quick read up and understand this better now.

Around here ... we don't have hydroelectric dams built on rivers which obviously have flowing water currents.

The dams around here are built on man made lakes for the purpose of drinking water supply to humans. Many of these are not 'Arch' dams and are simply straight across. The same forces do not come into play on these dams.

zenon5940
10-18-2009, 09:40 PM
I didn't know this? I wonder how that works?
Well, it would be a long explanation and my command of the English language is not that good so... Suffice it to say that because of the curve it will not tip over so easily. As an experiment just take a band of paper say 2mm wide and try to make it stand on its edge... if it is curved you will have no problem doing it...

Does this help you see why the curves ?

Mad Aussie
10-18-2009, 09:54 PM
Well, it would be a long explanation and my command of the English language is not that good so... Suffice it to say that because of the curve it will not tip over so easily. As an experiment just take a band of paper say 2mm wide and try to make it stand on its edge... if it is curved you will have no problem doing it...

Does this help you see why the curves ?
That's different from what I read about it ... BUT also makes perfect sense. We've all bent something to make it stand before I'm sure so that principle is easy to understand :)

English isn't your primary language?? I'd have never known! Your English is great!

Greg_Nuspel
10-18-2009, 10:01 PM
It's just like an arch only on it's side. The ancient Roman roads and aqueducts are great for these. Straight dams are never that high and actually thicker to stand the pressure.

zenon5940
10-18-2009, 10:38 PM
English isn't your primary language?? I'd have never known! Your English is great!
Well thanks MA for your kind comment. My primary language is French but I try hard to speak and write English so it is understood. Very important here in Canada to speak some English.

Thanks again.

Mad Aussie
10-18-2009, 10:42 PM
Well thanks MA for your kind comment. My primary language is French but I try hard to speak and write English so it is understood. Very important here in Canada to speak some English.

Thanks again.
Je t'en pris ;)

Bambi
10-18-2009, 10:47 PM
Just had a quick read up and understand this better now.

Around here ... we don't have hydroelectric dams built on rivers which obviously have flowing water currents.

The dams around here are built on man made lakes for the purpose of drinking water supply to humans. Many of these are not 'Arch' dams and are simply straight across. The same forces do not come into play on these dams.

those would be the gravity dams. they are constructed such that the force of the water pushes down on the structure.

Mad Aussie
10-18-2009, 11:39 PM
those would be the gravity dams. they are constructed such that the force of the water pushes down on the structure.
Hence why they angle back in toward the lake itself allowing the water to put downward pressure on the structure.

Aren't we learning a lot today ;)

tomorrowstreasures
10-19-2009, 10:23 AM
the BEAVERS engineered the rocks???? wow!!!!!!!