PDA

View Full Version : Guide on better Fireworks photography



mgstudio99
12-14-2009, 05:03 AM
Christmas is fast approaching and I am looking for a tips for better fireworks photography..

any suggestions??

Fortytwo
12-14-2009, 05:05 AM
Use a tripod and long shutter times. :) And include some other objects into the scene to give you a sense of scale.

Bambi
12-14-2009, 06:52 AM
to add to above: take about 500 pictures so that 2 or 3 will turn out well. :p

tirediron
12-14-2009, 01:02 PM
Use a tripod and remote-release/cable-release, preferably with your mirror locked up.

Set your aperture to f8 or so, and select manual focus, focusing on infinity.

Start with a shutter-speed of around 1.5 seconds and work up from there.

Use wider glass if possible, and as mentioned, keep things in the image which will provide a sense of scale.

Yisehaq
12-16-2009, 01:18 AM
I might add, try to release the shutter just before the fireworks burst out not as they are shooting up. It will be too early and the fireworks will not open up very wide if so.

Greg_Nuspel
12-16-2009, 06:55 AM
I set up my interval timer and let the camera go, sit back enjoy the show. Since I am not aware of the choreography I find this works for me. Otherwise there is a tendency to get the just after the best part images. I know it is random but I tend to get a few good ones each time.

With shows that are set to music you can predict the shots better so a remote release can be a good thing as long as you know the music and have a vision like the choreographer.

F8&Bthere
12-21-2009, 01:21 PM
How to Photograph Fireworks Displays (http://digital-photography-school.com/how-to-photograph-fireworks)

just one of many hits from a quick google.

I'll add to what others have said, DO NOT use a high ISO. One may think it's appropriate for night shots, but you will likely be disappointed in the noise. You're not really after fast shutter speeds anyway. You can use your camera's base ISO (usually 100 - 200).

Here's one from last Canada day taken with a 35mm lens on my 1.5x crop factor body, if I remember correctly I was at f8, focused out to infinity, ISO 200, on a tripod in Bulb mode firing with a wired remote shutter. Most of the time I was waiting for the shot from the ground to try to time the burst right and then opening the shutter for around a 3 to 4 count.

Bambi
12-21-2009, 02:32 PM
How to Photograph Fireworks Displays (http://digital-photography-school.com/how-to-photograph-fireworks)

just one of many hits from a quick google.

I'll add to what others have said, DO NOT use a high ISO. One may think it's appropriate for night shots, but you will likely be disappointed in the noise. You're not really after fast shutter speeds anyway. You can use your camera's base ISO (usually 100 - 200).

Here's one from last Canada day taken with a 35mm lens on my 1.5x crop factor body, if I remember correctly I was at f8, focused out to infinity, ISO 200, on a tripod in Bulb mode firing with a wired remote shutter. Most of the time I was waiting for the shot from the ground to try to time the burst right and then opening the shutter for around a 3 to 4 count.

wow F8, that's stunning!

F8&Bthere
12-21-2009, 03:43 PM
Thanks Bambi! Too bad the water wasn't clear and still that night for a nicer reflection- it's kind of a swampy pond and it was windy and raining. But that shot did win me 1st place in a local photo contest sponsored by a media (newspaper/radio) group, so I was pleased to say the least.

Bambi
12-21-2009, 06:12 PM
wow, congratulations. I like the soft golden glow on the pond.