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russ
03-12-2010, 10:40 AM
Well okay this is a bit of a rant derived from reading captions of photos (not just here)...

Anyway, just because it's tall & shaped like a cylinder and on or close to a farm does not make it a silo. Also, while we're at it, if it's round & short (& often says Butler on the side) that doesn't make it a silo either. Those are called grainery's. Silo's are for fermenting grain which is in turn fed to cattle. Most farms in Alberta & Saskatchewan do not have silo's as most silage in this part of the world is stored in pits dug into the side of a hill. A very fine example of a silo can be found just east of Wainwright, Alberta just south of highway 14.

Please forgive me it's not my intent to offend any of you. Just to point out that sometimes there a bit of misplaced terminology. :sorry:

Bambi
03-12-2010, 05:40 PM
okay, so what is it called? :shrug:
It needs a name.
:lightbulb
Or perhaps we can call it 'silo-like thingy' :laughing::laughing:

just kidding-really! :clown:

Greg_Nuspel
03-12-2010, 06:01 PM
Sorry but I use thingy instead of the proper nomenclature all the time:o

Bambi
03-12-2010, 06:59 PM
Sorry but I use thingy instead of the proper nomenclature all the time:o

me too! along with 'whatchamacallit'

AcadieLibre
03-12-2010, 07:17 PM
If it looks like a silo, if appears to us urban folk took look a silo, we will call it a silo. Of course I am always willing to learn, post the different ones and tell what they are called and they we can properly name our photos. I think proper terminology is fine when someone with more information can teach us something. Be cool to know.

russ
03-12-2010, 07:35 PM
if it's round & short (& often says Butler on the side) that doesn't make it a silo either. Those are called grainery's.

Sorry, I should be more clear & succinct when ranting. Anything that holds grain that isn't meant to ferment we call a grainary or a grain bin.

casil403
03-12-2010, 07:56 PM
if it's round & short (& often says Butler on the side) that doesn't make it a silo either. Those are called grainery's.


Sorry, I should be more clear & succinct when ranting. Anything that holds grain that isn't meant to ferment we call a grainary or a grain bin.

So is it spelled Grainery or Grainary? :shrug:

I've used the correct terminology having a Father who grew up in rural Saskatchewan. :)
When I don't know I tend to to use thingamajigger or thingy or whatchamacallit/slang version witchcalm (which Dad also taught me:)) Or the ever popular "you know...the thing" :thumbup:

russ
03-12-2010, 10:37 PM
So is it spelled Grainery or Grainary? :shrug:

Well there's the counter rant ;) the proper spelling is granary :headslap: Anyway, it looks as though I have a weekend photo project. Sorry no silo's though the closest one is in Wainwright and that's 150 km away.

casil403
03-13-2010, 05:59 AM
So this is a Silo Right?
Just a silo on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/eqqman/142532682/)
And these are granary's
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2672/4124829646_23f6920909.jpg

JAS_Photo
03-13-2010, 12:57 PM
What are they called if they have woodchips or something else in them? According to a commpany that sells them they are chip silos. I think the usage of the word silo to contain only silage has been lost to popular usage, after all missiles are kept in underground silos that they are launched from.

jjeling
03-13-2010, 02:44 PM
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3114/3592427228_f7cce05fb4_b.jpg

So what are these things called? Any ideas? It is used for shipping, and sits along the Maumee River. I would just call them the silos along the river. For those whom it does not matter what these are called, we usually just call them silos and dont try to distinguish the difference since we usually know what the other is talking about. It would make sense to know the difference if this was the type of lifestyle you are living, but thats def not me. Either way, I would never be able to tell the difference by looking at them, so they will always be called silos.

russ
03-13-2010, 04:36 PM
It really depends what the structure is designed for, the pic's from Ohio - I really have no idea. Could be anything including a malting facility hmmm beer :D hmmm whiskey ;) Sorry what we talking about again?

or it could be something to do with an entirely different industry.

Greg_Nuspel
03-13-2010, 04:58 PM
Read up Silo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silo)

Bambi
03-13-2010, 05:24 PM
so are we back to 'if it's tall and round it is a silo'? :shrug:

russ
03-13-2010, 05:33 PM
Read up Silo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silo)

As a rural inhabitant I can assure you, we don't call granaries silos. Especially on the prairies.

russ
03-14-2010, 11:35 AM
so are we back to 'if it's tall and round it is a silo'? :shrug:

Actually no, quoting directly from Greg's link...

A bin is typically much shorter than a silo, and is typically used for holding dry matter such as concrete or grain. Bins may be round or square, but round bins tend to empty more easily due to a lack of corners for the stored material to become wedged and encrusted.

Farmers tend to interchange bin & granary with each other but not the term silo, this is because a silo on a farm is used to ferment grain.

Bambi
03-14-2010, 12:00 PM
Actually no, quoting directly from Greg's link...

A bin is typically much shorter than a silo, and is typically used for holding dry matter such as concrete or grain. Bins may be round or square, but round bins tend to empty more easily due to a lack of corners for the stored material to become wedged and encrusted.

Farmers tend to interchange bin & granary with each other but not the term silo, this is because a silo on a farm is used to ferment grain.


okay got it now! :D

russ
03-14-2010, 12:13 PM
Well heres a whole set of definitions...

silo: Definition from Answers.com (http://www.answers.com/topic/silo)

jjeling
03-14-2010, 12:57 PM
So here is my question -

If I see a structure and have no clue what it is, even by definitition, how am I supposed to know what to call it?

I think this is why most of us just call them silos. We may know the difference, but if you cant tell by looking at them from the outside, you may as well just call it a silo. Call me ignorant or lazy for not wanting to learn, but if there is no way to distinguish the difference from the outside, then I cannot see any reason for me to recognize any difference.

Greg_Nuspel
03-14-2010, 02:17 PM
I think "tall round thingy of unknown contents that maybe fermenting or not" will be what I use since I'm not about to go and ask.

casil403
03-14-2010, 02:50 PM
LOL...PC agricultural terminology...who knew?:shrug: :laughing:
I think I'll just stick with "Happy Holidays" :D

Bambi
03-14-2010, 02:56 PM
I think "tall round thingy of unknown contents that maybe fermenting or not" will be what I use since I'm not about to go and ask.

:p 'thingy' seems easier. :laughing:

JAS_Photo
03-14-2010, 03:52 PM
Well, I could argue that just because it comes in a stemmed cocktail glass does not make it a martini. A martini is a drink made of gin (or possibly vodka ) with a bit of vermouth added. Period. It does not contain sour puss or pineapple juice or anything else. But I would be barking up a brick wall. Sometimes meanings change with usage and even though they are wrong you kind of end up having to go with the flow. :)

Greg_Nuspel
03-14-2010, 04:52 PM
Well, I could argue that just because it comes in a stemmed cocktail glass does not make it a martini. A martini is a drink made of gin (or possibly vodka ) with a bit of vermouth added. Period. It does not contain sour puss or pineapple juice or anything else. But I would be barking up a brick wall. Sometimes meanings change with usage and even though they are wrong you kind of end up having to go with the flow. :)

Well put, I live with a writer so I hear this many times. People argue about things that have changed and they don't feel it should. Just look up the phrase 'Blue Moon' it accidentally received a definition that stuck, so no matter how you argue it isn't the original meaning, it is now due to popular usage. A person may decide for themselves that they will never use this meaning for the word, but it won't stop it from being used by others.

C'est la vie

Mad Aussie
03-14-2010, 05:57 PM
Sorry, I should be more clear & succinct when ranting. Anything that holds grain that isn't meant to ferment we call a grainary or a grain bin.
You might call it that in the farming community of Canada but it may not be the case elsewhere.

For instance in Australia (from Wikipedia) a silo is a structure for storing bulk materials. Silos are used in agriculture to store grain (see grain elevators) or fermented feed known as silage. Silos are more commonly used for bulk storage of grain, coal, cement, carbon black, wood chips, food products and sawdust. Three types of silos are in widespread use today - tower silos, bunker silos and bag silos.

Dictionary references say something like ...


–noun
1. a structure, typically cylindrical, in which fodder or forage is kept.

2. a pit or underground space for storing grain, green feeds, etc.

3. Military. an underground installation constructed of concrete and steel, designed to house a ballistic missile and the equipment for firing it.

–verb (used with object)
4. to put into or preserve in a silo.

Origin:
1825–35; < Sp: place for storing grain, hay, etc., orig. subterranean; ulterior orig. uncert.


So, if I say to someone in Australia there's an old silo out at such and such they will correctly imagine a large cylindrical shaped storage item.

Bambi
03-14-2010, 06:19 PM
and that is the beauty of language. New words are added, old words drop out, words change their meaning and/or their part of speech (verbs become nouns and vice versa). Five years ago who woud have said 'I googled the meaning of silos'?

You can be the language police but you are spitting in the wind IMO.

russ
03-14-2010, 10:40 PM
and that is the beauty of language. New words are added, old words drop out, words change their meaning and/or their part of speech (verbs become nouns and vice versa). Five years ago who woud have said 'I googled the meaning of silos'?

You can be the language police but you are spitting in the wind IMO.

I've been using google forever, in fact I was using it when it was actually good.

As far as language police you bet - not using terms correctly can cause big issues even if it's a colloquialism. If MA came and asked me to order a new bonnet, I'd get him a hat. If a lady were to announce she was getting knocked up in the morning we have an entirely different definition than an Englishmen and so it goes with language anywhere. I was just trying to make a few people aware that the terminology in respect to my geography is incorrect.

Greg_Nuspel
03-14-2010, 10:47 PM
Well if she just put a joint in the oven and would like to get knocked up in an hour MAW would be there :headslap:

Bambi
03-14-2010, 11:03 PM
Hey Russ we are just yanking your chain.


Greg: if I had a nickel for every time I heard that......:p

and MA would look lovely in a new bonnet.


As they say around here: "I'm being cruelized" :laughing:

casil403
03-14-2010, 11:33 PM
Lol I am just scared the day some Aussie ask me for a Torch and instead of a flashlight I bring him a gigantic lit up Tiki torch :laughing:

Mad Aussie
03-14-2010, 11:49 PM
Canada really is a mongrel in terms of language isn't it! Cross between what? English, American, French with it's own colloquialisms thrown in as well.

Actually ... I just described Australia too really!

Bonnet in Australia can mean both the hood of a car AND a soft, often frilly hat for babies, poofs or strange woman :)