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mbrager
05-08-2010, 05:20 PM
Yesterday at Prince's Island, I saw several groups of goslings accompanied by two geese. Strictly guarded and herded, but not afraid of the people watching them. The people, on the other hand, are afraid of the poop left behind.
Mike

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4025/4589375435_a6655d9dbd.jpg http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4051/4589375669_5a065cf581.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4055/4589996872_bfd397bd46.jpg http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4025/4589376401_bc56c0d5cb.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4018/4587794131_e2e40059af.jpg http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4018/4589997344_441e2f0bef.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4046/4589376935_41ee905e21.jpg http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4056/4589375823_281d26a735.jpg

Mad Aussie
05-08-2010, 05:49 PM
Man .. .that's some brood!! Your colour balance sure was off in the first couple huh!

A neat set though and a cool title to go with it!

Iguanasan
05-08-2010, 06:16 PM
Cool set and very cute pile of goslings.

mbrager
05-08-2010, 06:54 PM
MA and Ig, thanks for the comments. I think I changed the white balance from As Shot to Cloudy, adding an orange cast. But I also used a warming filter layer. I'm going to upload a new version of the second shot leaving the white balance As Shot to see the difference. I think there is a difference: less brown/orange, more green/yellow. I'd be interested to know what you see.
Mike


http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4037/4589622951_6de41a265d.jpg

Michaelaw
05-08-2010, 06:59 PM
I can't fathom two geese having that many kids :eek:

Bambi
05-08-2010, 07:07 PM
I didn't know geese could have so many!!!

I love the setting sail shot.

mbrager
05-08-2010, 08:27 PM
I think JAS explained in a previous thread that the adult geese put their broods together and then teach them life skills as a large group. I noticed that only two geese accompanied the group, but there were others on the fringes keeping guard. We call it division of labor or a commune as if we invented it. LOL.

JAS_Photo
05-08-2010, 08:54 PM
Lol, very cute! What's a little goose pooh between friends?

Michaelaw
05-09-2010, 12:14 AM
I think JAS explained in a previous thread that the adult geese put their broods together and then teach them life skills as a large group. I noticed that only two geese accompanied the group, but there were others on the fringes keeping guard. We call it division of labor or a commune as if we invented it. LOL.

From my experience, if a gosling gets mixed up and tries to enter another brood the parents will chase it off quickly and with extreme prejudice. I'm not saying your community spirit idea is wrong, It's just something I've yet to witness:)

mbrager
05-09-2010, 02:13 AM
A quick online search indicates that females usually have 4-7 white eggs, and do care for their broods with the male. There are more than 25 goslings in one of my pictures. There are as may as 11 different species of Canada Goose. Michael, your description of their territoriality is accurate from what I read. Perhaps I was seeing a particularly large brood.
Who knows?
Mike

Bambi
05-09-2010, 02:27 AM
There are more than 25 goslings in one of my pictures. There are as may as 11 different species of Canada Goose. Michael, your description of their territoriality is accurate from what I read. Perhaps I was seeing a particularly large brood.
Who knows?
Mike

maybe they will have their own reality tv show? :shrug::headslap:

Michaelaw
05-09-2010, 02:30 AM
The only things I know about them comes from my observation. I'm glad you did a google on them because it does help resolve the idea of the communal goose :D As you said though seven eggs typical so what the hell happened here? I can't even figure out how the pair managed to incubate so many :eek: I can only theorize that the nest must have been deep as opposed to wide. Imagine if a human couple had that many offspring...Mom and dad would have to be way high up in the banking world getting big bonus payouts to support the team :laughing:

Michaelaw
05-09-2010, 02:32 AM
maybe they will have their own reality tv show? :shrug::headslap:

Don't tempt them Bambi :laughing: I mean the people who provide pacification on the glass teat!

mbrager
05-09-2010, 02:40 AM
The only things I know about them comes from my observation. I'm glad you did a google on them because it does help resolve the idea of the communal goose :D As you said though seven eggs typical so what the hell happened here? I can't even figure out how the pair managed to incubate so many :eek: I can only theorize that the nest must have been deep as opposed to wide. Imagine if a human couple had that many offspring...Mom and dad would have to be way high up in the banking world getting big bonus payouts to support the team :laughing:

Or royalty. Or Catholic. ;)

Michaelaw
05-09-2010, 02:49 AM
LMAO :laughing: Absolutely :highfive:

JAS_Photo
05-09-2010, 02:56 AM
Maybe it's two females raising their kids together?

Michaelaw
05-09-2010, 03:16 AM
If by chance both their mate's were killed It's a plausible idea I guess. I'd say probabilities were slim but I'm running on guesses here:)

Hillbillygirl
05-09-2010, 07:28 AM
Myself and husband have seen this many times over the years and it is a known fact among birders that they do have these "Gang Broods" as they are called. One pair will take over leadership duties while others of the flock have their guard duties.
Also, some without young, or with a small brood will aggressively take anothers brood right out from under them. Have personally witnessed the fight, and it is not nice at all.
We have seen this up close every year, as we are surrounded by several ponds, in which they nest annually.
Please, do not believe everything you read on the internet as gospel, but the following article hits the nail right on the head.

See here: Love Canada Geese (http://www.about.lovecanadageese.com/gang.html)

Greg_Nuspel
05-09-2010, 09:16 AM
I have seen this many times so I thought it was normal.

Wicked Dark
05-09-2010, 10:10 AM
Very informative about geese. Never knew about 'gang broods'. the fourth picture - the one almost straight down on the flotila, with one gosling to the left, is the best one. I love that one.

Marko
05-09-2010, 11:06 AM
LOVELY set - :highfive: :highfive:

My fave is this one...so serene.
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4025/4589376401_bc56c0d5cb.jpg

Wicked Dark
05-09-2010, 11:11 AM
that's the one I meant Marko...if only I'd been clever enough to repost it. : D

Michaelaw
05-09-2010, 01:26 PM
Well there you go, thanks for the info HBG:) It's not something our local geese seem to do. I looked up Canada geese too and most sites I called up had lots of factual info in the species but did not mention "gang brooding". The link you provided clearly shows that they do in fact engage in this social behavior. Not so much taking what you read on the internet as gospel as the facts I read were consistent to my observation, It's more like don't take what you don't read on the internet as gospel :D As I said, I've seen goslings try and joing the wrong brood, perhaps lost, and the parent goose will chase it off quickly and with vigor:)

Hillbillygirl
05-09-2010, 08:54 PM
Hey don't sweat it Michael. Had nothing to do with anything you said. What I was referring to was the article of which I linked to. I know not everything is perfect on the www, but this article explained what was happening in these pics to a "T", and many people were asking what the situation was about. We have actually gotten pics in the past with a brood of 48 goslings travelling with one pair of adults. Amazed to say the least, we were.
Have actually seen young be killed by adults when trying to join the wrong brood, only one smack of the wing, or a snap/toss-done. They are beautiful birds, but very powerful and brutal at times also. Even breeding is pretty aggressive, especially for the female.
BTW: Love the pic that Marko reposted there.

mbrager
05-09-2010, 09:55 PM
This turned into a very interesting thread. Thanks for adding all the information and comments, and for the comments on the photos. Much appreciated.
Mike

edG
05-11-2010, 05:39 AM
cool images