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casil403
05-15-2010, 12:15 AM
Charlie Rose interviews Martine Franck, photographer and widow of Henri Cartier-Bresson, Peter Galassi, director of the Museum of Modern Art's department of photography and Agnes Sire, director of Foundation Henri Cartier-Bresson...fascinating! :)
His works are currently on display at NYC's MoMA
1/2 hour long but really cool!

Martine Franck, photographer and widow of Henri Cartier-Bresson, Peter Galassi, director of the Museum of Modern Art's department of photography and Agnes Sire, director of Foundation Henri Cartier-Bresson

Ernst-Ulrich Schafer
05-15-2010, 10:15 AM
Link not working.

casil403
05-15-2010, 06:17 PM
Try this one....

Charlie Rose - Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Modern Century (http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/10966)

...and here is an interview Charlie Rose did with the great man himself in 2007:

http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/3615

Grant
05-15-2010, 08:35 PM
Thank you very much.

The reason I became interested in photography as an art form was because of Henri Cartier-Bresson. When I was much younger I bough my first camera for a very mundane purpose and while I always liked art I saw no connection between photography and art. To me, photography, was a really great way to record and to illustrate but not very expressive. In those days I lived in a town that had a French Consulate and for a while they adorned the wall of the bottom floor meeting rooms with Henri Cartier-Bressonís work. I am not sure about circumstance on how I got to see the images, it may have been a rare opening of the doors to the public or maybe some other reason. In any event I took my wife, then girlfriend to see the images with me. The funny thing is I am sure there was no one else there, just the two of us. We arrived in the early afternoon and stayed until the curator informed us it was closing time, it was past nine. Our stay seemed like minutes but in reality it was hours. From that point on my view of photography was never the same.