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Delineation

This is a discussion on Delineation within the General photography forums, part of the Photography & Fine art photography category; Originally Posted by kat Would you take this client on knowing that most likely you wont find a shot to ...

  1. #31
    tirediron is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by kat View Post
    Would you take this client on knowing that most likely you wont find a shot to please her? That nothing pleases her. Or would you try for it just to see if you can..a challenge.
    Interesting - the way I would approach this would be to do a series of a half-dozen or so poses the way she wants and then ask her to pose for a half-dozen the way you want. Then, the load the images into your field laptop, and show them to her. Then if she still wants to do it her way, go ahead and do it her way, after all, it's her dollar.

  2. #32
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    I personally wouldn't take it on as I am not confident enough in myself to think I could make her happy with the shots. I can hit the proper exposure most of the time and my composition skills are getting better but portrait photography is more a skill in communication and "people reading" and I haven't had enough practice.
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  3. #33
    Travis is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by kat View Post
    I'm just wondering...how everyone would handle this situation at the level of experience they are at.

    This is just a scenario

    I have a woman who wants shots taken. When she smiles, she has gums that you can't miss and a smile that never looks genuine, even when it is. When she isn't full teeth smile, she has that smile/or serious looks that resemblesses she's faking it, that she is pissy and snobby. She doesn't like her triple chin. But she wants poses that would protray it. She doesn't want a good view of her nose. And nothing is to be shot from the shoulders down because she thinks she is too fat for it. She just isn't happy with herself...

    Would you take this client on knowing that most likely you wont find a shot to please her? That nothing pleases her. Or would you try for it just to see if you can..a challenge.

    Is there a way to make one realize that we aren't models and to flaunt what we have and accept it..ha ha..in an 1 hour shoot!

    I have my theory but want to see what others think.
    Well.. they are hiring your for your skills and artistic vision... it should be you directing posing to best flatter the subject but the easiest thing to do is both. Take shots using poses you think would best flatter the client, and take some with posing they want. Then present both when showing the contact sheet.

    I had a similar event with a family that was insistent on their shoot location being their newly built Muskoka room (sortofa indoor/outdoor room). The problem was the room was too small and littered with distractions. I obliged but only the condition we also shoot in the much larger living room. Worked out great. Balance is good to please the customer.

    I think the most important thing is to never let the session die without you having some/most things done your way. Bottom line it's your work and you should be pleased with the bulk of what you submit as finished work.
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  4. #34
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    I am still a little reserved about the subject of this thread. In the terms we have layed out for a professional I am not one of them by any means. If you look at the different needs for the individuals who are using their camera's, then sometimes the first dslr is all they will need. It seems unlikely that someone can go out and shoot events with an entry level dslr for a career. On the flip side though, for people like myself, who never planned on getting into event photography, the first dslr I bought, was really all Ive needed. Ive always looked at photography as an art. In the meantime, people have fallen in love with my work and ask me to take pictures for them. Having moved from standard 35mm slr, into the k110 dslr, and recently got an alpha 100. To me it has never been about making any money, its all just for personal gratification. For some, the first dslr is all that is necessary. If you find a shot you like, then there is usually time to adjust your settings for the necessary image you want. Not sure how the rest of you feel, but with a smaller meg camera, the margin of error is much less, and the importance of getting the shot right the first time will force you to take better pictures when you move up into another camera. Even after having the combination of both cameras for over 6 months, I still use the original more than the new one. It is more comfortable, and button placement is better. Although the Sony is technically a "better" camera, there really is no difference between any camera if your not taking pictures at sporting events, weddings or anything else. No offense meant to anyone in this statement, but I think its funny how some people get mad about those who feel they can do anything with their first dslr. Then there are others, after experiencing other cameras, still prefer to use the first dslr, who are then generalized as "over-confident beginners" or "hacks." It is a shame when people get their first dslr and have the "I can do anything now" mentality, but its also a shame when people spend $1500 on one thinking they will get better shots than another they could have spent $400 on.
    There are an unlimited amount of opportunities available for photography, as long as your creative about your thinking and the way you want to take your shots, the best camera money can buy, will take the same pictures the cheapest dslr costs. Its when you start getting into the type of photography your shooting that will have a large affect on your camera selection/purchase.


    The camera doesn't make a bit of difference. All of them can record what you are seeing. But, you have to SEE.
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    Last edited by jjeling; 02-20-2009 at 11:17 AM.
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    tomorrowstreasures is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjeling View Post
    I am still a little reserved about the subject of this thread. In the terms we have layed out for a professional I am not one of them by any means. If you look at the different needs for the individuals who are using their camera's, then sometimes the first dslr is all they will need. It seems unlikely that someone can go out and shoot events with an entry level dslr for a career. On the flip side though, for people like myself, who never planned on getting into event photography, the first dslr I bought, was really all Ive needed. Ive always looked at photography as an art. In the meantime, people have fallen in love with my work and ask me to take pictures for them. Having moved from standard 35mm slr, into the k110 dslr, and recently got an alpha 100. To me it has never been about making any money, its all just for personal gratification. For some, the first dslr is all that is necessary. If you find a shot you like, then there is usually time to adjust your settings for the necessary image you want. Not sure how the rest of you feel, but with a smaller meg camera, the margin of error is much less, and the importance of getting the shot right the first time will force you to take better pictures when you move up into another camera. Even after having the combination of both cameras for over 6 months, I still use the original more than the new one. It is more comfortable, and button placement is better. Although the Sony is technically a "better" camera, there really is no difference between any camera if your not taking pictures at sporting events, weddings or anything else. No offense meant to anyone in this statement, but I think its funny how some people get mad about those who feel they can do anything with their first dslr. Then there are others, after experiencing other cameras, still prefer to use the first dslr, who are then generalized as "over-confident beginners" or "hacks." It is a shame when people get their first dslr and have the "I can do anything now" mentality, but its also a shame when people spend $1500 on one thinking they will get better shots than another they could have spent $400 on.
    There are an unlimited amount of opportunities available for photography, as long as your creative about your thinking and the way you want to take your shots, the best camera money can buy, will take the same pictures the cheapest dslr costs. Its when you start getting into the type of photography your shooting that will have a large affect on your camera selection/purchase.


    The camera doesn't make a bit of difference. All of them can record what you are seeing. But, you have to SEE.
    Ernst Haas
    bang on - to use Marko's term... I think vision is critical as is skill - be it with any sort of gear. if you don't know it inside and out, it is difficult to achieve consistent good results. show someone with skill and vision an average snap, and they can, with their vision and skill make it into something that the owner would gladly frame.
    BUT in stressful, fast paced situations such as wedding photography, it you have the more advanced gear and know it inside and out it can be of GREAT advantage as Travis was saying.

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