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tack sharp images - help needed to save sanity.

This is a discussion on tack sharp images - help needed to save sanity. within the General photography forums, part of the Photography & Fine art photography category; when i shoot jpegs, it is always large....

  1. #41
    edbayani11's Avatar
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    when i shoot jpegs, it is always large.

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    kat
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    Quote Originally Posted by baddness View Post
    in the menu where it says picture style is where you can change the sharpness, contrast, saturation and color tone. But I thought that it was only for the jpegs not raw.
    Ohh..you mean the "vivid" mode. You know I've never even tried that out..only went into that menu for b&w..didn't like it and never went back again!!! Gonna have to give it a whirl!!!

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    Travis is offline Senior Member
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    [QUOTE=baddness;12496]I shoot raw + jpeg. I read somewhere that you can bump up the in camera sharpening, contrast etc. but it only affects the jpeg files. Does nothing to the raw files. /QUOTE]


    This is correct because raw files are still basically 1's and 0's with no processing algorithms (sharpness, colour profile, noise reduction, saturation levels) attached to it.

    The in camera settings only apply when the camera converts the RAW image to jpeg after you take the shot. So yes.... if you shoot JPEG+RAW you can adjust your camera settings without affecting the RAW file.

    If you shoot RAW only your camera picture control settings are pretty much irrelevant. The reason for some confusion is that when you shoot a RAW image a tiny little jpeg is embedded into the file. This is so you can see the image on your cameras LCD. The camera will use the picture control settings to create the little jpeg and sometimes people interpret this as the RAW image. Same goes if you import the RAW file using the manufacturer software.
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  4. #44
    Travis is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by kat View Post
    Ohh..you mean the "vivid" mode. You know I've never even tried that out..only went into that menu for b&w..didn't like it and never went back again!!! Gonna have to give it a whirl!!!
    If ur a jpeg shooter, and know a bit about post processing (which i see from you images that you do) , it's always best to keep your in camera settings relatively flat and do your extra sharpening and colour adjustments in your editing program. This will prevent the camera from over sharpening and/or over saturating the image. You can always add a little in the end.
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  5. #45
    baddness is offline Senior Member
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    [QUOTE=Travis;12653]
    Quote Originally Posted by baddness View Post
    I shoot raw + jpeg. I read somewhere that you can bump up the in camera sharpening, contrast etc. but it only affects the jpeg files. Does nothing to the raw files. /QUOTE]


    This is correct because raw files are still basically 1's and 0's with no processing algorithms (sharpness, colour profile, noise reduction, saturation levels) attached to it.

    The in camera settings only apply when the camera converts the RAW image to jpeg after you take the shot. So yes.... if you shoot JPEG+RAW you can adjust your camera settings without affecting the RAW file.

    If you shoot RAW only your camera picture control settings are pretty much irrelevant. The reason for some confusion is that when you shoot a RAW image a tiny little jpeg is embedded into the file. This is so you can see the image on your cameras LCD. The camera will use the picture control settings to create the little jpeg and sometimes people interpret this as the RAW image. Same goes if you import the RAW file using the manufacturer software.
    That is what I thought, but at times can get a bit confused


    Quote Originally Posted by Travis View Post
    If ur a jpeg shooter, and know a bit about post processing (which i see from you images that you do) , it's always best to keep your in camera settings relatively flat and do your extra sharpening and colour adjustments in your editing program. This will prevent the camera from over sharpening and/or over saturating the image. You can always add a little in the end.
    It also helps to have a calibrated monitor. I'm looking at getting something for mine but there is so many calibrators out there. Not sure what to get

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