Restrictions on Aperture — I Felt Restricted

Ten days or so ago I posted on Face­book that it was going to be an f/2.8 day (using large aper­tures) and a strange thing hap­pened —  it was quite unex­pected actu­ally. What hap­pened was that I found myself hand­cuffed — unable to shoot. This seemed strange to me because I’ve put restric­tions on myself for fun a few times in the past but never an aper­ture restric­tion. In the past it was shoot­ing with a spe­cific focal length or delib­er­ately using an extra-high ISO or shoot­ing with a spe­cific theme in mind.

But this aper­ture restric­tion was dif­fer­ent for me and in ret­ro­spect I can see why. It depends on what play­ground you hang out in. If you are mainly a por­trait per­son, you shoot cre­ative por­traits wide open; that’s cool and fun…but it’s eas­ier because there is already some guid­ance with regard to sub­ject mat­ter. But when you go out ‘just to shoot’ and you’ll shoot just about any­thing that’s visu­ally inter­est­ing, then it gets harder.

For some crazy rea­son I found myself search­ing for scenes that I felt were wor­thy of what f/2.8 can do bokeh wise. I was plac­ing this sin­gle aspect of the lens above all else and it was taint­ing my expe­ri­ence of look­ing for scenes to shoot. It was slow­ing me down and suck­ing from the joy of pho­tog­ra­phy for pure pleasure.

So for this rea­son — I didn’t like this par­tic­u­lar aper­ture restric­tion exer­cise even though I DO like the con­cept of restric­tion exer­cises in gen­eral. Maybe it’s also because I feel like I should have been able to over­come the restric­tion more eas­ily. Truth is, I really didn’t feel like I had any­thing of value on day 1. Then life gets busy and so I took a few days and waited more patiently for scenes where a large aper­ture seemed more appro­pri­ate. Here are a few that I liked. These were all taken near f/2.8 (I say near because I used a cou­ple of dif­fer­ent lenses whose largest aper­tures were near f/2.8).

Vorsky - ISO 200 f/1.8 1/100

Vorsky — ISO 200, f/1.8, 1/100

Beer Kitteh - ISO 3200 f/2.5 1/80

Belle Gueule — Beer Kit­teh — ISO 3200, f/2.5, 1/80

Not Recommended - ISO 200 f/2.8 0.3

Not Rec­om­mended — ISO 200, f/2.8, 0.3

Light Trip - Palais Des Congres - Montreal - ISO 200 f/1.8 1/2500

Light Trip — Palais Des Con­gres — Mon­treal — ISO 200, f/1.8, 1/2500

Past Reflections - ISO 200 F/1.8 1/200

Past Reflec­tions — ISO 200, F/1.8, 1/200

117 — Noise Halos and Chromatic Aberration — Interview with Royce Howland

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #117 fea­tures an inter­view with fine art pho­tog­ra­pher Royce How­land where we dis­cuss the ‘junk’ that can get into our pho­tographs. In par­tic­u­lar we dis­cuss and dis­sect noise, halos and chro­matic aber­ra­tion in pho­tog­ra­phy. We talk about how to avoid get­ting these prob­lems, how to fix these prob­lems and how for some pho­tog­ra­phers — these aren’t prob­lems at all but rather, delib­er­ate cre­ative choices.

Royce does an AWESOME job of explain­ing these prob­lems so that they are under­stand­able to anyone. 

This is the longest pod­cast I’ve pub­lished to date and it clocks in at around 70 min­utes. We spend roughly 20 min­utes on each of the 3 top­ics. We cover halos first, then noise, then chro­matic aber­ra­tion. Each of the 3  issues have very dif­fer­ent causes and solutions.

Scroll to the BOTTOM of this post to find the player to imme­di­ately lis­ten to the audio podcast.

On the Rocks, Moraine Lake by Royce Howland

On the Rocks, Moraine Lake by Royce How­land — An HDR exam­ple where Royce con­trolled the set­tings to make sure no halos appeared in the sky or water.

Fall at Abraham Lake by Royce Howland

Fall at Abra­ham Lake by Royce How­land — Another HDR exam­ple where Royce left the halo­ing in the sky, and in fact accen­tu­ated it a bit more via a Pho­to­shop Curves adjust­ment, to give a sense of glow over the moun­tains. So some­times halos are not a flaw, they’re a cre­ative choice.

Looming, Abraham Lake by Royce Howland

Loom­ing, Abra­ham Lake by Royce How­land — An HDR exam­ple involv­ing a high con­trast back­lit scene. The trees were deeply shad­owed. Even on a Pen­tax 645D medium for­mat cam­era, there’s noise in those trees in a nor­mal sin­gle expo­sure. Bot­tom left — A 100% crop of a sin­gle expo­sure that went into the image above show­ing the level of noise in the trees. Bot­tom right — A 100% crop of the final image. Using a com­bi­na­tion of HDR tech­nique and a touch of addi­tional noise reduc­tion, I was able to sub­tly boost the con­trast in the deep shad­ows, pre­serve all of the gen­uine detail, and also vir­tu­ally elim­i­nate the dig­i­tal noise. With­out HDR tech­nique, just using a noise reduc­tion fil­ter can take the dig­i­tal noise down but gen­er­ally also will sac­ri­fice legit­i­mate detail as well.

Ghost Of Server Present, Jerome by Royce Howland

Ghost Of Server Present, Jerome by Royce How­land — An indoor shot taken with avail­able light in some­what dim con­di­tions at a sup­pos­edly haunted hotel. I’m using a bunch of cre­ative tech­niques here includ­ing shal­low depth of field, a reflec­tion in a mir­ror, sub­ject motion blur and extra dig­i­tal blur­ring. Despite the soft­en­ing effects of all the tech­niques used in this image, I also wanted a bit of tex­ture and bit of “vin­tage film grain” feel. So far from remov­ing all dig­i­tal noise, I actu­ally con­trolled it and then added a uni­form mono­chro­matic grain layer on top of every­thing in Pho­to­shop. In print up to 16x20 size it’s dif­fi­cult to see this grain, but on a nice matte paper it gives a slight feel­ing of tex­ture; whereas run­ning noise reduc­tion as I would nor­mally do in fact makes the results look­ing flat and plas­tic. You can see the noise detail added in the bot­tom detailed part of the image.

Chromatic aberration example at f/3.5 by Royce Howland

Chro­matic aber­ra­tion exam­ple at f/3.5 by Royce How­land — It was a bit after noon so the sun was high, and I shot straight into the light. The tree branches against a darker back­ground show extremely high con­trast edges. I was using a Sony RX100 pocket cam­era, which is a very high qual­ity point & shoot with a Carl Zeiss lens. So a qual­ity piece of kit for a com­pact. The first com­po­si­tion was at medium lens zoom and the aper­ture wide open — f/3.5. Bot­tom left — A 100% crop of the shot shows a lot of green and pur­ple fringes are vis­i­ble along the branch edges. Even towards the cen­ter of the lens, the chro­matic aber­ra­tion is pretty bad. This is a file con­verted from RAW using the lat­est Adobe Cam­era Raw in Pho­to­shop CS6, no chro­matic aber­ra­tion removal. Bot­tom right — Now here’s the iden­ti­cal file, but using the green and pur­ple fringe removal set­tings dur­ing RAW con­ver­sion. Quite strong set­tings were needed for the green fringes, not so strong for pur­ple. Mostly the fringes were removed.

Chromatic aberration example at f/5.6 by Royce Howland

Chro­matic aber­ra­tion exam­ple at f/5.6 by Royce How­land — Now here is the same com­po­si­tion pho­tographed again moments later in the same strong light, but stop­ping the lens down to f/5.6. Bot­tom left — Stop­ping the lens down just over 1 stop has actu­ally got­ten rid of many of the pur­ple & green fringes with­out doing any­thing else. That’s because a slightly smaller aper­ture lets through less of the mis­aligned light rays that con­tribute to the chro­matic aber­ra­tion in the first place. This is a RAW file con­verted again with no chro­matic aber­ra­tion set­tings. Bot­tom right — And here’s the same file con­verted with a small amount of pur­ple and green defringe set­tings, much less than needed in the first exam­ple and the results look better.

 

Links /resources men­tioned in this pod­cast:
Royce How­land Pho­tog­ra­phy
Photo real­is­tic HDR pod­cast with Royce How­land
Wikipedia Chro­matic Aber­ra­tion
DXO Optics
Topaz Denoise
Nik DFINE 2
Noise Ninja
PTLens
Emily Carr Images - She delib­er­ately painted in what we today call Halos. Shore­line, 1936 is an exam­ple.

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca ( A T ) G m ail Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

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If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
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Thanks to Jared Fein and Enrique Waizel who posted a blog com­ment about our last pod­cast. Thanks as well to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email

You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!

116 — Sharpness on Steroids — Focus stacking interview with Michael Breitung

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #116 fea­tures an inter­view with Ger­man land­scape pho­tog­ra­pher Michael Bre­itung where we talk about why and how to do focus stack­ing in pho­tog­ra­phy. Basi­cally focus stack­ing involves tak­ing mul­ti­ple frames of the same scene but each frame is focused at a dif­fer­ent part of the image. Then these frames are blended together using a graph­ics pro­gram like Gimp (free) or Pho­to­shop (expen­sive). The result is sharp­ness and depth of field on steroids that can’t be matched by any cam­era lens com­bi­na­tion on a 35mm DSLR cam­era at the time of this writ­ing.  Only tilt shift lenses can com­pete in this extreme sharp­ness arena, but those lenses require many saved dol­lars or a rich uncle. This tech­nique is free if you have the skills and a graph­ics program.

Scroll to the BOTTOM of this post to find the player to imme­di­ately lis­ten to the audio podcast.

Bloody Causeway - a focus stacked image by Michael Breitung

Bloody Cause­way by Michael Bre­itung — This focus stacked image blends 4 frames into one. Each frame was focused at a dif­fer­ent point and then blended in Pho­to­shop. Check out the sharp­ness from the clos­est cor­ners all the way to the end of the cause­way. This is sharp­ness swim­ming in awe­some sauce. The aper­ture used here was f/9.5

 

Kraichgau at Dawn - Focus stacked photograph by Michael Breitung

Kraich­gau at Dawn — Focus stacked pho­to­graph by Michael Breitung

 

Kraichgau at Dawn - Close up comparison by Michael Breitung

Kraich­gau at Dawn Details — Close up com­par­i­son by Michael Bre­itung — Only 2 frames were needed to cre­ate the final full-sized image above this one. One frame (left) focused at the fore­ground cor­ners, gets the cor­ners sharp in the final image. The other frame (right) focused at the midground, gets both the midground and the back­ground sharp. Then the frames are blended in Pho­to­shop to pro­duce the final image. The aper­ture used here was f/11.

 

Links /resources men­tioned in this pod­cast:
Michael Bre­itung Pho­tog­ra­phy
Michael Breitung’s (advanced) start to fin­ish tuto­r­ial on his (Lightroom/Photoshop) post-processing work­flow and how he cre­ated the Bloody Cause­way image.
Heli­con Focus image stack­ing soft­ware
Zerene Stacker
Tilt shift lenses in land­scape pho­tog­ra­phy
March 2013 reg­u­lar Assign­ment — Wet or Rain
March 2013 level 2 Assign­ment — Dra­matic angles

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

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If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :)  Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks to D. Lavoie who posted a blog com­ment about our last pod­cast. Thanks as well to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!

Photoshop file exposure and exif data

When we are work­ing on our images in pro­grams like Pho­to­shop, some­times we for­get the expo­sure infor­ma­tion in the orig­i­nal file. We can also for­get many other use­ful bits of infor­ma­tion that are embed­ded in the file like did the flash fire, what focal length was used etc.

In Light­room and Bridge (comes free with Pho­to­shop) this Exif data is easy to find, the default pro­gram set­tings reveal this infor­ma­tion clearly.  Not so in Pho­to­shop where it is buried under the file menu (in Windows).

File — File info.… reveals the Exif data for any image you are work­ing on in Pho­to­shop. Click on the Cam­era Data tab to see the expo­sure information.

The key­board short cut (Win­dows) ALT + SHIFT + CTRL +I does the same thing.
The key­board short cut (Mac) OPTION + SHIFT + COMMAND +I does the same thing.

How to find exposure or exif data in Photoshop

How to find expo­sure or exif data in Pho­to­shop (This is a CS6 win­dows screenshot)

 

How to find exposure or exif data in Photoshop (This is a CS5 Mac screenshot)

How to find expo­sure or exif data in Pho­to­shop (This is a CS5 Mac screenshot)

115 — Color spaces — monitor settings — recommended hardware — Interview with Joe Brady

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #115 fea­tures an inter­view with Colour expert Joe Brady who works for Mac­group US.
Joe knows pretty much every­thing there is to know about get­ting accu­rate colour from your mon­i­tor and your printer. Joe has recorded 2 pod­casts with us already about mon­i­tor cal­i­bra­tion and those links are listed below in the shownotes. In this pod­cast, we tackle some colour con­cepts that are a source of con­fu­sion for many peo­ple. We talk about mon­i­tor set­tings like colour tem­per­a­ture, gamma, and lumi­nance. Then we tackle the sRGB, Adobe RGB and Prophoto RGB colour spaces and explain what they are, the advan­tages of each and when and where they are most use­ful. Finally, Joe rec­om­mends some cal­i­bra­tion tools, mon­i­tors and printers.

Scroll to the BOTTOM of this post to find the player to imme­di­ately lis­ten to the audio podcast.

Color spaces in photography

This image shows off the 3 main color spaces. You’ll note that the ProPhoto RGB color space con­tains the most col­ors. This makes it the best color space for print­ing your own images on a qual­ity printer. When post­ing to the web, the colour space should be sRGB as that is the type of mon­i­tor that most peo­ple have.

Links /resources men­tioned in this pod­cast:
Pod­cast 62 – Mon­i­tor – printer cal­i­bra­tion – Inter­view with Joe Brady
Pod­cast 63 – Review of the Col­or­munki and the i1XTreme
Joe Brady Pho­tog­ra­phy
X-Rite Col­or­Munki Photo Color Man­age­ment Solu­tion at B&H
X-Rite Col­or­Munki Dis­play at B&H
Eizo FlexS­can SX2262W at B&H
Eizo Col­orEdge CG223W 22 at B&H

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :)  Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks to Mikey88  who posted a blog com­ment about our last pod­cast. Thanks as well to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!

114 — 360 degree light painting — Interview with Patrick Rochon

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #114 fea­tures an inter­view with light painter Patrick Rochon who dis­cusses his new exper­i­men­tal 360 degree light paint­ing tech­nique. In a nut­shell, Patrick light paints a model who stands in the mid­dle of a ring as 24 DSLR cam­eras around the ring expose the scene at the same time. The frames are then strung together with soft­ware to give the illu­sion of cir­cu­lar move­ment. Patrick and I talk about his new work, his older work, and we talk about Patrick’s light paint­ing process as well.

Scroll to the BOTTOM of this post to find the player to imme­di­ately lis­ten to the audio podcast.


360 Degree light paint­ing by Patrick Rochon

This is a Gif ani­ma­tion that Patrick cre­ated from one of the 360 degree light paint­ing sessions

light painting by Patrick Rochon - animated Gif

Light paint­ing by Patrick Rochon — Ani­mated Gif

 

This is the ‘ring’ where Patrick lit the mod­els:
light painting by Patrick Rochon

While I was at Patrick’s place record­ing this inter­view, I noticed a gallery of new light painted (non 360) pho­tographs on his wall that were gor­geous. This image below was one that I really liked — Thx for send­ing it Patrick!

light painting by Patrick Rochon
Light paint­ing by Patrick Rochon ©Patrick Rochon

Links /resources men­tioned in this pod­cast:

patrickrochon.com
24x360.comTime­code LabEric Paré
Pod­cast #82 — Light paint­ing por­traits
LPWA – Light Paint­ing World Alliance
Light paint­ing pho­tog­ra­phy
Ani­mated gif pho­tog­ra­phy (AKA Cin­ema­graphs)
Aurora Crow­ley Light Painter 
Begin­nings — New —  is our reg­u­lar forum assign­ment for Jan­u­ary
– Light paint­ing — light draw­ing is our level 2 forum assign­ment for Jan­u­ary 
Photo tours of Montreal

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :)  Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks to Photo Stu­dios  who posted a blog com­ment about our last pod­cast. Thanks as well to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!

113 — Six essential photography day trip accessories

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #113 dis­cusses what I feel are six essen­tial acces­sories for day trip pho­tog­ra­phy. I just came back from a super-quick trip to Nevada where I did solo day trips on 2 days to Red Rock Canyon and Val­ley of Fire State Park.

For now, my day trips to national/state/provincial/local parks and other cool places are easy ON-TRAIL day trips and the acces­sories that I’ve cho­sen to talk about reflect this. I go into detail about why these 6 acces­sories are essen­tial in the pod­cast. The list I’ve come up with includes a tri­pod, polar­iz­ing fil­ter, hik­ing shoes/boots, polar­ized sun­glasses, a lens cloth and knee-pads.

Of course I’m SUPER-CURIOUS as to any other acces­sories lis­ten­ers may sug­gest, so please feel free to let me know if you think I missed something.

6 essential accessories for day trip photography
Pharaoh Rock — Val­ley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA  ©Marko Kulik

Links /resources men­tioned in this podcast:

REI Las Vegas - Awe­some sport­ing store — Ask for Tommy, he’s awesome.

Tripods for pho­tog­ra­phy Pod­cast #96

Polar­iz­ing fil­ters and other impor­tant fil­ters Pod­cast #77

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
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MY APOLOGIES THAT THE WEBSITE FIELD TO COMMENT WASN’T THERE, PLEASE JUST CONNECT WITH ME TO ADD IT. I’LL GET THIS FIXED FOR THE NEXT PODCAST.

Thanks to Mac Sokul­ski, Dave John­son, Enrique Waizel, Bernard Dal­laire, JP, Bret Far­ris and Syl­vain Raci­cot who posted  blog com­ments about our last pod­cast.. Thanks as well to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!

112 — Why camera bags suck

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #112 addresses a ques­tion posed by Gor­don Laing on Google+
The best cam­era bag — what do you use?

I replied to that ques­tion say­ing that these days I usu­ally shoot bag free and keep my lenses that are in lens hold­ing cases, attached to my belt as per the pic­ture below. In case peo­ple are inter­ested, here is a list of the items that I carry with me most of the time with­out a bag. Gitzo car­bon fibre tri­pod (2540LLVL) also referred to as ‘my baby’. That’s on a Gitzo tri­pod shoul­der strap slung diag­o­nally around my shoul­der. It’s an ‘OK’ strap, no bet­ter. I’m still hunt­ing for the per­fect tri­pod shoul­der strap. Usu­ally I carry 3 lenses;  Nikon 14–24, Nikon 28–300, Nikon 50mm and 1 flash, the SB-800.

More details on the exact lenses and lens hold­ers are listed in the affil­i­ate links below from B&H.

I also carry in my pock­ets a cable release, spare bat­ter­ies, lens cloth and a hex key for my cam­era bracket plate. Not shown is the flash­light that I’ll often have with me for night shoots. Not shown are the cokin fil­ters that I some­times keep in a pouch around my neck.

Obvi­ously this setup will not work for many peo­ple car­ry­ing very large lenses and heav­ier gear — but this will work for most peo­ple that shoot with lenses that are about as large as an aver­age 70-200mm  F-2.8. This setup is also meant to give peo­ple new ideas on car­ry­ing gear.

I’m also seri­ously into know­ing if other peo­ple have alter­na­tive gear car­ry­ing meth­ods so please feel free to share by commenting.

No camera bag

Although it’s no fash­ion get up, this set-up allows my back to feel great and it allows me to change lenses quickly.

Links /resources men­tioned in this podcast:

Lowe­pro S&F Lens Exchange Case 200AW at B&H - My favourite lens hold­ing case. It’s FAB!

Pear­stone Onyx 60 Lens Case — In the pod­cast I talk about the Lowe­pro 2S but it seems to be dis­con­tin­ued. This model seems to have sim­i­lar specs.

Lowe­pro 50mm lens holder at B&H

Lens Changer 75 Pop Down V2.0 from Think tank for larger lenses like a 100-400mm or for shoot­ing 70-200mm with the lens hood attached. You may need to buy their belt to use this though.

Nikon 28-300mm f/3.5–5.6G ED VR Zoom Lens at B&H — I just love the ver­sa­til­ity of the focal range.

Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G ED AF Lens at B&H - This lens and I are hav­ing a won­der­ful rela­tion­ship, I love her.

Gitzo GT2540LLVL Lev­el­ing Car­bon Fiber Tri­pod at B&H - This tri­pod works well for me. Fairly big but not too big.

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :)  Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks as always to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!

111 — My shit weather photo vacation

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #111 is a per­sonal account of the worst photo vaca­tion I have ever taken and the steps I took to make the expe­ri­ence more enjoy­able. I’d love to know how oth­ers have dealt with this issue in the past.

The Road to Nowhere - Yukon, Canada

The Road to Nowhere — Yukon, Canada
9 out of 10 days had vis­i­bil­ity sim­i­lar to this — Seren­ity now was my mantra

 

Due to all the bad vis­i­bil­ity in the moun­tains, I looked to the fore­ground instead which was often clear. Here I caught logs and tree stumps reflect­ing in the water at a small unnamed lake in Inu­vik, NWT, Canada

Lake Logs - Inuvik, NWT

Lake Logs — Inu­vik, NWT

 

Details are another fun thing to shoot when the grand scen­ics are bask­ing in obscu­rity.
This is the back of the sil­ver pick-up truck  we rented after cov­er­ing 400 KM on the muddy Demp­ster highway.

Dempster Highway Truck - Yukon, Canada

Demp­ster High­way Truck — Yukon, Canada
This truck was sil­ver before it got com­pletely caked with thick Demp­ster high­way mud.


Links /resources men­tioned in this podcast:

Rain Pho­tog­ra­phy — pod­cast #88

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :)  Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks as always to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!

110 — Crash course in black and white film photography

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #110 gives you a full on crash course in black and white film pho­tog­ra­phy in around 30 min­utes. Black and white film pho­tog­ra­phy is not at all dead. Many cre­ative pho­tog­ra­phers are get­ting their hands wet in a tra­di­tional dark­room.  If you’ve ever wanted to know what’s involved in black and white pho­tog­ra­phy, I take you through the entire process. We talk about film cam­eras, film, devel­op­ing film, print­ing con­tact sheets and print­ing a final print.
Thanks to John Vales from our photography.ca face­book group for sug­gest­ing this topic. Please feel free to “Like” that page. :)

Links /resources men­tioned in this podcast:

Apug.org — Ana­log Pho­tog­ra­phy Users Group
keh.com
Film pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast with John Mead­ows
Ilford Delta 3200
Kodak Tri-X film
Kodak T-Max film
The neg­a­tive by Ansel Adams
Photo tuto­r­ial on devel­op­ing film. Shows nor­mal, under, over­ex­posed negs
Load­ing film onto a reel

Cir­cles is our reg­u­lar forum assign­ment for Spetem­ber
– Self Por­traits in a Mir­ror is our level 2 assign­ment for September

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :)  Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks to Lucille B and Michael Van der Tol who posted  blog com­ments about our last pod­cast. Thanks as always to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!

Essential and Advanced Filters for Creative and Outdoor Photography — E-book Review

A few months ago Dar­win Wiggett and Saman­tha Crysan­thou Pub­lished an e-book called Essen­tial and Advanced Fil­ters for Cre­ative and Out­door Pho­tog­ra­phy.  You may think that with dig­i­tal pho­tog­ra­phy the need for fil­ters is over and you would be mis­taken in think­ing this.

Cer­tain fil­ters like the polar­iz­ing fil­ter are essen­tial and at the time of this writ­ing, the effect of this fil­ter (which stays on my lens 95% of the time that I shoot out­doors in the day) is best achieved with an actual fil­ter on the lens. Although I have seen digital-effect polar­iz­ing fil­ters that you apply when post-processing an image, they suck when com­pared to the real thing. Dar­win and Saman­tha pro­vide awe­somely clear images and expla­na­tions as to why this fil­ter is essen­tial, how and when to use it cre­atively and when not to use it. This fil­ter is so impor­tant that a good 20% of the book is devoted to it. This sec­tion alone is worth the 10 dol­lars that they are charg­ing for the e-book.

Two other kinds of essen­tial fil­ters that Dar­win and Saman­tha talk about a great deal are grad­u­ated neu­tral den­sity fil­ters and neu­tral den­sity fil­ters. The pur­pose of grad­u­ated neu­tral den­sity fil­ters is to reduce the con­trast in a scene (like a clipped sky) because when a scene is too con­trasty the cam­era can not record all the tones even though our eye may see them. The fil­ters are nor­mally made of glass or plas­tic and are usu­ally shaded at one end and clear at the other end. Neu­tral den­sity fil­ters are solid coloured and are mainly used to make shut­ter speeds longer to achieve cre­ative blur­ring effects. This sec­tion of the book also has awe­some (fil­tered and non-filtered for com­par­i­son) images and crys­tal clear expla­na­tions on how to use these filters.

The final sec­tion of the book is ded­i­cated to addi­tional fil­ters that can add pop to your images as well as talk­ing about tech­ni­cal con­sid­er­a­tions like colour casts and noise reduction.

This e-book is fab and well worth the ten dol­lars. The only thing I might debate in this book is call­ing the neu­tral grad fil­ters essen­tial. I feel they are essen­tial only in cer­tain very impor­tant  cases. They are essen­tial if you want to spend less time in front of your com­puter post-processing your images, because your images will already have the con­trast con­trol built into the expo­sure. If you are already excel­lent at the HDR tech­nique, (tak­ing mul­ti­ple frames of the iden­ti­cal image with dif­fer­ent expo­sures and then blend­ing them in soft­ware) then these fil­ters are not essen­tial because you can achieve a sim­i­lar goal using HDR. That said, even if you know the HDR tech­nique well, grad­u­ated neu­tral den­sity fil­ters are still use­ful (per­haps even essen­tial) when the scene is con­trasty and involves movement.

It may come as no sur­prise that I highly rec­om­mend this 65 page e-book. Dar­win and Saman­tha are vet­eran pho­tog­ra­phers and teach­ers, write super-clearly and their pics really illus­trate the cre­ative effect these fil­ters have. This is an easy read with an easy on the eyes design. It’s a great e-book to have with you on your smart­phone or tablet for cre­ative inspi­ra­tion while in the field. It’s also a fab resource when you are think­ing about which of these fil­ters to buy.

This book can be pur­chased directly from Dar­win and Sam’s site. 

109 — Flash photography tips — Interview with Joe McNally

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #109 fea­tures an Inter­view about flash pho­tog­ra­phy with well known pho­tog­ra­pher Joe McNally. Joe has been shoot­ing for decades for well known mag­a­zines life Life, Sports Illus­trated and National Geo­graphic. He was in town giv­ing a sem­i­nar on the vari­ety of light­ing tech­niques you can achieve by using just one or two flashes. After the sem­i­nar I sat down with Joe for this quick inter­view  to talk about flash tips. In this pod­cast we talk about dif­fus­ing your flash, trig­ger­ing your flash and Joe talks about per­sonal projects.

© Joe McNally

 

Links /resources men­tioned in this podcast:

Joe McNally’s blog  — Joe McNally’s Dance Port­fo­lio
– Cold Bev­er­ages is our reg­u­lar forum assign­ment for July
– Oppo­sites is our level 2 forum assign­ment for July

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :)  Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks to Lucille B and Julian who posted  blog com­ments about our last pod­cast. Thanks as always to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!