orthopedic pain management

Using a Reflector in photography — Photography podcast #30

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #30 is all about how to use reflec­tors to bet­ter your pho­tog­ra­phy. We focus on com­mon types of reflec­tors, when to use them as well as why reflec­tors are an essen­tial item‚for every‚photographer’s toolkit.The fol­low­ing pho­tographs illus­trate how effec­tive a reflec­tor can be to add light to sub­jects that are in shadow or that need a lit­tle extra boost of light. Note how espe­cially the eyes of both my boy (Ziglet the cat) and my wife (pos­ing in ‘Pulp Fic­tion’ style)‚receive extra illu­mi­na­tion and become much more vibrant when a reflec­tor is used. Note that the expo­sure DID NOT change for any of the reflected/unreflected shots. I also did not do any manip­u­la­tion what­so­ever in a graph­ics pro­gram as I wanted to clearly illus­trate the effects of chang­ing only 1 vari­able. (adding a reflec­tor) You can click the pho­tographs to enlarge them.

You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below this set of images.‚


Ziglet — No reflector

Ziglet — With reflec­tor — Eyes and face are vibrant

Ziglet — No reflector

Ziglet with reflec­tor doing its job in the photo

Carmy — No reflector

Carmy — With reflec­tor — Eyes and face are vibrant

Carmy with reflec­tor doing its job in the photo

New seg­ment in the pod­cast — Photography.ca — Photo of the week -
This week, the pho­to­graph is by Arkady Renko and I com­ment in the pod­cast on why I think this pho­to­graph is fantastic.

Photography by Arkady Renko

Other pho­tog­ra­phy links men­tioned in this pod­cast;
Flickr
Lead­ing lines in pho­tog­ra­phy
The rule of thirds in pho­tog­ra­phy

Thanks as always for the com­ments by‚Bekka, Al and Norm‚on our pre­vi­ous podcast‚where we Interviewed‚fine art pho­tog­ra­pher Rafael Gold­chain. We LOVE com­ments and sug­ges­tions so please send more.

Rafael Goldchain Interview — Photography podcast #29

This pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast‚fea­tures an inter­view with teacher and fine art pho­tog­ra­pher Rafael Gold­chain. In the inter­view Rafael tells us about his past work and we delve into his lat­est work called Famil­ial Ground.‚This work‚contains over 50 mas­ter­fully cre­ated self-portraits based on Rafael’s fam­ily his­tory and the influ­ences of the dif­fer­ent cultures‚that help make up his‚life. Rafael freely talks about how the project came to be, as well as all the tech­ni­cal ele­ments of the project includ­ing; light­ing, shoot­ing, print­ing and dig­i­tally post pro­cess­ing the photographs.

More of Rafael’s por­traits from this series can be seen at Lumi­nous Lint‚and Robot Fol­low.
A few of Rafael’s older images can be seen on this site, Photography.ca
For more infor­ma­tion on Rafael’s work, he‚can be con­tacted via email‚rafael (a t)rafaelgoldchain(d o t)com

Other pho­tog­ra­phy links men­tioned in this pod­cast;
The Applied Pho­tog­ra­phy pro­gram at Sheri­dan Col­lege.
Pho­tog­ra­phy at Ryer­son
Fine art pho­tog­ra­pher Susan Meise­las

Thanks as always for the com­ments by daronJ and‚Gary‚H on our pre­vi­ous pod­cast Pos­ing mod­els in pho­tog­ra­phy . We LOVE com­ments and sug­ges­tions so please send more.

You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below this set of images.


Rafael Gold­chain
Self-Portrait as Naf­tuli Gold­szajn
[Famil­ial Ground] — 2000‚
Light­jet chro­mogenic print — 30 x 40 in‚
Pro­vided by the artist — Rafael Gold­chain
b. Kras­nik, Poland, early 1800’s
d. Kras­nik, Poland, late 1800’s

Rafael Gold­chain
Self-Portrait as Reizl Gold­schain
[Famil­ial Ground] — 2001‚
Light­jet chro­mogenic print — 30 x 40 in‚
Pro­vided by the artist — Rafael Gold­chain
b. Poland, 1905
d. Buenos Aires, Argentina 1975

Rafael Gold­chain
Self-Portrait as Don Moi­ses Rubin­stein Kro­n­gold — Middle-aged
[Famil­ial Ground] — 2000‚
Light­jet chro­mogenic print — 30 x 40 in‚
Pro­vided by the artist — Rafael Gold­chain
b. Ostrowiec, Poland, 1902
d. Cuer­navaca, ’‚©xico 1980