orthopedic pain management

80 — Clean your camera’s sensor — cleaning camera lenses

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #80 talks about how to clean your DSLR camera’s sen­sor. It describes the wet tech­nique and the dry tech­nique and it’s not as scary as it seems. We also talk about how to clean your camera’s mir­ror as well as clean­ing cam­era lenses and gen­eral cam­era care.

Cleaning cameras lenses and camera sensors

Links /resources men­tioned in this podcast:

Orig­i­nal sug­ges­tion thread for this pod­cast from our pho­tog­ra­phy forum
The vis­i­ble dust web­site — Cam­era and cam­era sen­sor clean­ing prod­ucts
The Cop­per­hill Method of sen­sor clean­ing — They sell clean­ing kits and prod­ucts as well
Sen­sorKlear by Lenspen demo on Youtube
Cam­era and cam­era sen­sor clean­ing sup­plies at B&H
Lenspen Sen­sorKlear to clean cam­era sen­sors at B&H
Air blower at B&H
March 2010’s Light and Shadow assign­ment on the Photography.ca forum
Hat tip to pho­tog­ra­pher Dominic Fuiz­zotto for his insight on sen­sor cleaning.

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :) Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks to Jimmy Brown,  Wicked­dark, jack label, Fortytwo and Zenon5940 who posted a blog com­ment about our last pod­cast. Thanks as always to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. I Sub­scribe with iTunes I Sub­scribe via RSS feed I Sub­scribe with Google Reader I Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

80 — Clean your camera’s sensor — cleaning camera lenses

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #80 talks about how to clean your DSLR camera’s sen­sor. It describes the wet tech­nique and the dry tech­nique and it’s not as scary as it seems. We also talk about how to clean your camera’s mir­ror as well as clean­ing cam­era lenses and gen­eral cam­era care.

Cleaning cameras lenses and camera sensors

Links /resources men­tioned in this podcast:

Orig­i­nal sug­ges­tion thread for this pod­cast from our pho­tog­ra­phy forum
The vis­i­ble dust web­site — Cam­era and cam­era sen­sor clean­ing prod­ucts
The Cop­per­hill Method of sen­sor clean­ing — They sell clean­ing kits and prod­ucts as well
Sen­sorKlear by Lenspen demo on Youtube
Cam­era and cam­era sen­sor clean­ing sup­plies at B&H
Lenspen Sen­sorKlear to clean cam­era sen­sors at B&H
Air blower at B&H
March 2010’s Light and Shadow assign­ment on the Photography.ca forum
Hat tip to pho­tog­ra­pher Dominic Fuiz­zotto for his insight on sen­sor cleaning.

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :) Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks to Jimmy Brown,‚ Wicked­dark, jack label, Fortytwo and Zenon5940 who posted a blog com­ment about our last pod­cast. Thanks as always to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. I Sub­scribe with iTunes I Sub­scribe via RSS feed I Sub­scribe with Google Reader I Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

29 other things to buy after your first DSLR

I recently did a pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast on buy­ing your first DSLR. In that pod­cast I sug­gested NOT spend­ing a whack of cash on your first cam­era body, and sav­ing it for lenses and acces­sories instead.

Speak­ing of all those accessories…member masp from our pho­tog­ra­phy forum started this thread list­ing other items you’ll need to go with that first DSLR if you want to get seri­ous about pho­tog­ra­phy. It’s a big list for sure but it will give new­bies in par­tic­u­lar a feel for what many advanced shoot­ers con­sider to be essen­tial gear, acces­sories and must have gadgets.

So hat tip to masp once more for this list! Feel free to add your own sug­ges­tions in the com­ments if you feel any­thing is missing.

Here’s a par­tial check­list I’ve put together from my own research and lis­ten­ing to the pod­cast. I’m sure I’ve prob­a­bly left some­thing impor­tant out here or there, so please let me know if you spot any omis­sions or use­ful things I should include. Aster­isks denote the stuff that is more impor­tant or cheap enough to buy first.

A. CAMERA PROTECTION
* 1. UV fil­ter ($10 to 30 to $60?)
* 2. Padded cam­era case
3. Cam­era armor?
* 4. LCD screen cover if not included. (Included for Nikons)
* 5. Viewfinder cover and mag­ni­fier
6. Fancy cam­era strap, like the Black Rapid straps?
* 7. Lens hood for any lenses that lack one. (Also keeps stuff from bang­ing into your lens)

B. CLEANING
* 8. Microfiber cloth and a “huff of breath” (Can’t be more than a few bucks)
9. Air blower. Marko says to buy from a cam­era store, but Ken Rock­well says a $5 air blower from a drug store may suf­fice. Any rea­son to dis­agree with Rock­well here? (I’m kinda cheap )
* 10. Also con­sider a blower brush or lenspen. ($5–10)
* 11. Sil­ica gel — it eats mois­ture in humid con­di­tions (A few bucks)

C. PHOTOGRAPHIC TOOLS
12. Polar­izer and ND fil­ters
* 13. Tri­pod ($50? — $140 + + No rea­son not to buy used though, I think)
14. Maybe a mono­pod for porta­bil­ity, but a tri­pod seems more use­ful.
15. Flash (con­sider buy­ing the most expen­sive one)
* 16. Reflec­tors maybe, or just a cheap piece of card­board wear­ing white cloth­ing.
17. Light meter. Use­ful for stu­dio work mainly.

D. COMPUTER STUFF
* 18. SD or CF reader. Can you go with a cheap one here? As long as is a high speed one, I *think* it’s okay, but I’d hate to cor­rupt my data.
19. Photo printer. Pict­bridge?
20. A decent mon­i­tor that isn’t exces­sively blue, con­trasty or bright (refer­ring to cal­i­bra­tion pod­cast)
21. Mon­i­tor and printer color cal­i­bra­tion tools.
22. Pho­tog­ra­phy soft­ware (I’m going to stick with what’s free for now, but I sup­pose I’ll even­tu­ally buy some soft­ware when I fig­ure out what’s most stan­dard)
23. Color cal­i­bra­tion equip­ment ($400-$1400?). Some may be avail­able for $200 or under. Con­sider buy­ing one before you start doing a lot of editing.

E. MISCELLANY
24. Spare bat­tery ($10 to $30 on Ama­zon, more for brand name)
25. SD or CF card ($20 to $40 depend­ing on desired size)
26. Extra lens and body caps (los­ing the orig­i­nals may lower the resale value of your gear?)
27. Plas­tic trash bags to cover your gear bag if it’s not water­proofed and it starts rain­ing. White ones may dou­ble as reflec­tors if you don’t mind look­ing unpro­fes­sional.
28. Zip lock bags for hold­ing your clean­ing sup­plies and other stuff maybe.
29. Base­ball bat for when some guy on the street tries to grab your cam­era. J/K J/K I don’t con­done vio­lence, except for the Three Stooges variety.

1 bloody good reason to try the camera before you buy

The answer is PAIN.

I recently upgraded cam­eras and pur­chased a Nikon D700. It’s an awe­some cam­era and I love it except for one thing…it does not feel great in my hand. In fact, after using it for a month it has been caus­ing me a good deal of pain in my shoot­ing hand.

SHAME ON ME.

I should know bet­ter, I coun­cil peo­ple to try before they buy and yet I did not fully lis­ten to my own advice. Here’s what hap­pened — I actu­ally tried the D700 for a week­end 4 months ago. On that week­end I shot with the D700 for two peri­ods of about 1 hour and my hand felt fine. I did notice that it was a heavy cam­era but I felt fine so I fig­ured all was good.

SHAME ON ME.

I mean when I go out to shoot nor­mally, on a gig or for plea­sure, I USUALLY shoot for 3–4 hours (plus plus). So test­ing on 2 peri­ods of 1 hour was a huge mis­take. But I was in a “rush” to test the cam­era as it was only on loan for the weekend..and week­ends are often busy.

PLEASE LEARN FROM MY ERROR.

Before you spend a whack of cash on a cam­era, test it for the length of time that you nor­mally shoot with. Try­ing it in the store or for an hour is bet­ter than noth­ing but it’s not an accu­rate test. Rent the cam­era you intend to buy for a week­end espe­cially if it is an expen­sive cam­era. Many larger brick and mor­tar cam­era stores will deduct the rental price off your new cam­era if you end up buy­ing it. For my own case, I think adding a bat­tery grip will solve the prob­lem as it will take the excess weight off my shoot­ing hand and divide it more evenly.….but this could have been avoided if I had fully fol­lowed my own advice.

79 — Customizing your camera for free

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #79 talks about how to cus­tomize your cam­era using the cus­tom set­tings func­tions in your camera’s menu. There are many, many, many use­ful ways to cus­tomize these set­tings for the way YOU per­son­ally shoot, but many pho­tog­ra­phers don’t use these set­tings or are afraid to touch these set­tings. Many fea­tures that your cam­era offers are set to OFF by default, and the only way to access them is by turn­ing their cus­tom func­tion on in the cus­tom menu of your cam­era. A quick and easy exam­ple is high ISO. On my for­mer 30D from Canon, this set­ting was set to off so my high­est nor­mally avail­able ISO was 1600. With one set­ting change in the cus­tom func­tion menu the high­est avail­able ISO becomes 3200.‚ This pod­cast encour­ages you to play with sim­i­lar (and even bet­ter) set­tings in your camera.

Nikon D700 customization menu
Nikon D700 cus­tomiza­tion menu

Links /resources men­tioned in this podcast:

The Nikon D700 at B&H
March 2010’s Light and Shadow assign­ment on the Photography.ca forum

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :) Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks to Wicked­dark, jack label, f8&Bthere, sephi­box, Fortytwo and Casil403 who posted a blog com­ment about our last pod­cast. Thanks as always to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. I Sub­scribe with iTunes I Sub­scribe via RSS feed I Sub­scribe with Google Reader I Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Photography forum image of the month – Feb. 2010

Every month on our pho­tog­ra­phy forum mem­bers nom­i­nate images that they like. Then at the end of the month I choose an excel­lent image and talk about why it rocks. The photo I choose is not nec­es­sar­ily the best one of the month. I’ve come to real­ize it’s not really log­i­cal to pit images from totally dif­fer­ent gen­res against each other. That’s why there are cat­e­gories in photo con­tests. I just choose a photo that has extremely strong ele­ments that we can learn from.

Message delivered by Michaelaw - Click for a larger version

Mes­sage deliv­ered by Michaelaw — Click for a larger version

This month’s choice Mes­sage deliv­ered is by Michaelaw.

I chose this image for sev­eral reasons.

First off look at the great mood Michaelaw has cre­ated here. This is no acci­dent; it’s a prod­uct of Michael’s atten­tion to the the light­ing. This mood helps cre­ate the story that ‘makes’ this shot. What IS the story? That’s up to the viewer, it’s helped by the title, but there is a story here. The bot­tle is with­out a clas­sic paper mes­sage in it, it’s empty save for some water. Who sent it, why? Maybe the beer bot­tle itself IS the mes­sage — “hey I’m on a ben­der; that’s my mes­sage”. Maybe the shot is really about the envi­ron­ment and Man’s lack of con­cern over it. But there IS a story here, you just have to choose it for yourself.

Com­po­si­tion­ally I like this very much. The curved pat­terned for­ma­tions in the sand add inter­est to the shot. The diag­o­nal slant of the bot­tle with spec­u­lar edge high­lights really give my eye some­thing to cling to. The focus also works very well for me here and I’m dig­ging the back­ground blur. My eye is skill­fully guided along the bot­tle toward the slanted water level col­lected at the bot­tom. At bot­tom of the bot­tle we see the sun’s reflec­tion and it grabs you.

Expo­sure is han­dled very well here with a good range of tones and excel­lent high­light control.

For all these rea­sons, this is my choice for image of the month.

Since we all have opin­ions, some mem­bers may dis­agree with my choice. That’s cool but THIS thread is not the place for debate over my pick, NOR is it the place to fur­ther cri­tique the image. The pur­pose here is to sug­gest strong ele­ments in the photo that we may learn from.

Con­grats again Michaelaw for cre­at­ing this beau­ti­ful image!

I’d also like to include these 2 images as hon­ourable men­tions as they also came so so close to being picked.

Behind the mask by Chantelle

Day 3 — Banff  by casil403

Day 3 - Banff

Photography forum image of the month ‚” Feb. 2010

Every month on our pho­tog­ra­phy forum mem­bers nom­i­nate images that they like. Then at the end of the month I choose an excel­lent image and talk about why it rocks. The photo I choose is not nec­es­sar­ily the best one of the month. Ižve come to real­ize itžs not really log­i­cal to pit images from totally dif­fer­ent gen­res against each other. Thatžs why there are cat­e­gories in photo con­tests. I just choose a photo that has extremely strong ele­ments that we can learn from.

Message delivered by Michaelaw - Click for a larger version

Mes­sage deliv­ered by Michaelaw — Click for a larger version

This month’s choice Mes­sage deliv­ered is by Michaelaw.

I chose this image for sev­eral reasons.

First off look at the great mood Michaelaw has cre­ated here. This is no acci­dent; it’s a prod­uct of Michael’s atten­tion to the the light­ing. This mood helps cre­ate the story that ‘makes’ this shot. What IS the story? That’s up to the viewer, it’s helped by the title, but there is a story here. The bot­tle is with­out a clas­sic paper mes­sage in it, it’s empty save for some water. Who sent it, why? Maybe the beer bot­tle itself IS the mes­sage — “hey I’m on a ben­der; that’s my mes­sage”. Maybe the shot is really about the envi­ron­ment and Man’s lack of con­cern over it. But there IS a story here, you just have to choose it for yourself.

Com­po­si­tion­ally I like this very much. The curved pat­terned for­ma­tions in the sand add inter­est to the shot. The diag­o­nal slant of the bot­tle with spec­u­lar edge high­lights really give my eye some­thing to cling to. The focus also works very well for me here and I’m dig­ging the back­ground blur. My eye is skill­fully guided along the bot­tle toward the slanted water level col­lected at the bot­tom. At bot­tom of the bot­tle we see the sun’s reflec­tion and it grabs you.

Expo­sure is han­dled very well here with a good range of tones and excel­lent high­light control.

For all these rea­sons, this is my choice for image of the month.

Since we all have opin­ions, some mem­bers may dis­agree with my choice. That’s cool but THIS thread is not the place for debate over my pick, NOR is it the place to fur­ther cri­tique the image. The pur­pose here is to sug­gest strong ele­ments in the photo that we may learn from.

Con­grats again Michaelaw for cre­at­ing this beau­ti­ful image!

I’d also like to include these 2 images as hon­ourable men­tions as they also came so so close to being picked.

Behind the mask by Chantelle

Day 3 — Banff‚ by casil403

Day 3 - Banff

Let your skills rock the everyday scene

As admin of a grow­ing pho­tog­ra­phy web­site I look at a good 20–100 pho­tographs most days of the week. The qual­ity of work that I look at (both on our site and other web­sites) nor­mally ranges from pho­tog­ra­phy enthu­si­ast to pro.

One of the things that sep­a­rates ama­teurs from advanced amateurs/pros is the abil­ity to cre­ate the image rather than wait­ing for some­thing spec­tac­u­lar to hap­pen or find­ing it through serendip­ity. Get­ting to this level involves 3 key things that are 100% attain­able with a few months of reg­u­lar practice.

1 — You need to under­stand basic expo­sure.
2 — You need to under­stand basic com­po­si­tion
3 — You need to under­stand basic lighting.

A per­son that prac­tices all 3 of these things can cre­ate great shots from oth­er­wise mun­dane scenes. IF they are wait­ing for some­thing to hap­pen (like wait­ing for great out­door light),‚ they make sure they are wait­ing at the right time.

Sunset landing by Michael Wollen

Sun­set land­ing by Michael Wollen — Click to see larger version.

The image above by forum mem­ber michaelaw (real name Michael Wollen ) is a great exam­ple. How many times have we looked up at the sky to watch a plane land in the dis­tance. Likely many times. It’s a com­mon scene. Some might even call it banal. But take a look at THIS image. It is care­fully crafted — NO acci­dents here.

Look at the beau­ti­ful light in the sky. Michael waited for this light. Look at the posi­tion of the plane in the sky. Michael waited to freeze the plane in that exact spot. Look at the land­ing pad at the lower part of the image, look at the foliage and shim­mer­ing water in the imme­di­ate fore­ground. They are there on pur­pose. They are there, because Michael put them there. Because Michael put them there at the right time,‚ in the right place, and exposed the image cor­rectly — This pho­to­graph sings and is a plea­sure to look at.

Prac­tice the 3 basics listed above and you too will be armed with the skills needed to cre­ate great pho­tog­ra­phy from com­mon­place scenes.