114 — 360 degree light painting — Interview with Patrick Rochon

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #114 fea­tures an inter­view with light painter Patrick Rochon who dis­cusses his new exper­i­men­tal 360 degree light paint­ing tech­nique. In a nut­shell, Patrick light paints a model who stands in the mid­dle of a ring as 24 DSLR cam­eras around the ring expose the scene at the same time. The frames are then strung together with soft­ware to give the illu­sion of cir­cu­lar move­ment. Patrick and I talk about his new work, his older work, and we talk about Patrick’s light paint­ing process as well.

Scroll to the BOTTOM of this post to find the player to imme­di­ately lis­ten to the audio podcast.


360 Degree light paint­ing by Patrick Rochon

This is a Gif ani­ma­tion that Patrick cre­ated from one of the 360 degree light paint­ing sessions

light painting by Patrick Rochon - animated Gif

Light paint­ing by Patrick Rochon — Ani­mated Gif

 

This is the ‘ring’ where Patrick lit the mod­els:
light painting by Patrick Rochon

While I was at Patrick’s place record­ing this inter­view, I noticed a gallery of new light painted (non 360) pho­tographs on his wall that were gor­geous. This image below was one that I really liked — Thx for send­ing it Patrick!

light painting by Patrick Rochon
Light paint­ing by Patrick Rochon ©Patrick Rochon

Links /resources men­tioned in this pod­cast:

patrickrochon.com
24x360.comTime­code LabEric Paré
Pod­cast #82 — Light paint­ing por­traits
LPWA – Light Paint­ing World Alliance
Light paint­ing pho­tog­ra­phy
Ani­mated gif pho­tog­ra­phy (AKA Cin­ema­graphs)
Aurora Crow­ley Light Painter 
Begin­nings — New —  is our reg­u­lar forum assign­ment for Jan­u­ary
– Light paint­ing — light draw­ing is our level 2 forum assign­ment for Jan­u­ary 
Photo tours of Montreal

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

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My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
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If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :)  Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks to Photo Stu­dios  who posted a blog com­ment about our last pod­cast. Thanks as well to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!

Essential and Advanced Filters for Creative and Outdoor Photography — E-book Review

A few months ago Dar­win Wiggett and Saman­tha Crysan­thou Pub­lished an e-book called Essen­tial and Advanced Fil­ters for Cre­ative and Out­door Pho­tog­ra­phy.  You may think that with dig­i­tal pho­tog­ra­phy the need for fil­ters is over and you would be mis­taken in think­ing this.

Cer­tain fil­ters like the polar­iz­ing fil­ter are essen­tial and at the time of this writ­ing, the effect of this fil­ter (which stays on my lens 95% of the time that I shoot out­doors in the day) is best achieved with an actual fil­ter on the lens. Although I have seen digital-effect polar­iz­ing fil­ters that you apply when post-processing an image, they suck when com­pared to the real thing. Dar­win and Saman­tha pro­vide awe­somely clear images and expla­na­tions as to why this fil­ter is essen­tial, how and when to use it cre­atively and when not to use it. This fil­ter is so impor­tant that a good 20% of the book is devoted to it. This sec­tion alone is worth the 10 dol­lars that they are charg­ing for the e-book.

Two other kinds of essen­tial fil­ters that Dar­win and Saman­tha talk about a great deal are grad­u­ated neu­tral den­sity fil­ters and neu­tral den­sity fil­ters. The pur­pose of grad­u­ated neu­tral den­sity fil­ters is to reduce the con­trast in a scene (like a clipped sky) because when a scene is too con­trasty the cam­era can not record all the tones even though our eye may see them. The fil­ters are nor­mally made of glass or plas­tic and are usu­ally shaded at one end and clear at the other end. Neu­tral den­sity fil­ters are solid coloured and are mainly used to make shut­ter speeds longer to achieve cre­ative blur­ring effects. This sec­tion of the book also has awe­some (fil­tered and non-filtered for com­par­i­son) images and crys­tal clear expla­na­tions on how to use these filters.

The final sec­tion of the book is ded­i­cated to addi­tional fil­ters that can add pop to your images as well as talk­ing about tech­ni­cal con­sid­er­a­tions like colour casts and noise reduction.

This e-book is fab and well worth the ten dol­lars. The only thing I might debate in this book is call­ing the neu­tral grad fil­ters essen­tial. I feel they are essen­tial only in cer­tain very impor­tant  cases. They are essen­tial if you want to spend less time in front of your com­puter post-processing your images, because your images will already have the con­trast con­trol built into the expo­sure. If you are already excel­lent at the HDR tech­nique, (tak­ing mul­ti­ple frames of the iden­ti­cal image with dif­fer­ent expo­sures and then blend­ing them in soft­ware) then these fil­ters are not essen­tial because you can achieve a sim­i­lar goal using HDR. That said, even if you know the HDR tech­nique well, grad­u­ated neu­tral den­sity fil­ters are still use­ful (per­haps even essen­tial) when the scene is con­trasty and involves movement.

It may come as no sur­prise that I highly rec­om­mend this 65 page e-book. Dar­win and Saman­tha are vet­eran pho­tog­ra­phers and teach­ers, write super-clearly and their pics really illus­trate the cre­ative effect these fil­ters have. This is an easy read with an easy on the eyes design. It’s a great e-book to have with you on your smart­phone or tablet for cre­ative inspi­ra­tion while in the field. It’s also a fab resource when you are think­ing about which of these fil­ters to buy.

This book can be pur­chased directly from Dar­win and Sam’s site. 

109 — Flash photography tips — Interview with Joe McNally

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #109 fea­tures an Inter­view about flash pho­tog­ra­phy with well known pho­tog­ra­pher Joe McNally. Joe has been shoot­ing for decades for well known mag­a­zines life Life, Sports Illus­trated and National Geo­graphic. He was in town giv­ing a sem­i­nar on the vari­ety of light­ing tech­niques you can achieve by using just one or two flashes. After the sem­i­nar I sat down with Joe for this quick inter­view  to talk about flash tips. In this pod­cast we talk about dif­fus­ing your flash, trig­ger­ing your flash and Joe talks about per­sonal projects.

© Joe McNally

 

Links /resources men­tioned in this podcast:

Joe McNally’s blog  — Joe McNally’s Dance Port­fo­lio
– Cold Bev­er­ages is our reg­u­lar forum assign­ment for July
– Oppo­sites is our level 2 forum assign­ment for July

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :)  Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks to Lucille B and Julian who posted  blog com­ments about our last pod­cast. Thanks as always to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!

106 — White balance and why snow is blue

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #106 dis­cusses the often con­fus­ing topic of white bal­ance and why some­times the cam­era screws up our images like giv­ing us blue snow. Cor­rect­ing this is really easy and it just requires a bit of under­stand­ing of what is going on in the back­ground.  In a very tight over­sim­pli­fied nut­shell, when we see some­thing that has colour, it has that colour due to the colour tem­per­a­ture of the light source illu­mi­nat­ing it.

Light a can­dle in a dark room and look at a white base­ball; it will look orange. The same thing hap­pens with white snow that looks bluish under cloudy over­cast con­di­tions because cloudy light is bluish. Our eyes might not notice the blue because our brain com­pen­sates for the cast because it “knows” that snow is white, but the cam­era often gets it wrong. In this pod­cast we talk about white bal­ance, auto­matic white bal­ance, the white bal­ance pre­sets that your cam­era comes with and set­ting a cus­tom white bal­ance. If you’ve ever wanted to improve the colour accu­racy of your images, this photo pod­cast offers up some fast tips.

Colors and color temperature in photography

Left image — When we see an object that has colour, it has that colour due to the color tem­per­a­ture of the light source illu­mi­nat­ing it. This is why if we take a white base­ball into a room lit only by a can­dle, the base­ball looks orange. The same thing hap­pens when we take a pic­ture of white snow on a cloudy over­cast day and it looks blue. Right image — White light (the kind we see at noon on a sunny cloud­less day) is actu­ally made up of equal parts of Red, Blue and Green light. These are the pri­mary colours in photography.

 

Blue snow in photography

Left Image — The camera’s AWB (auto­matic white bal­ance) didn’t ren­der this scene prop­erly and the snow looks bluish because the day was cloudy and cloudy light is bluish. Right Image — I cor­rected this in post pro­cess­ing and the snow looks more nat­ural to the eye.

 

AWB and 2 presets
If your image has a colour cast, to neu­tral­ize it, you add the OPPOSITE colour of the cast. 

 

Mixed lighting in photography

This image was lit with 2 light sources; the light com­ing from the stove AND over­cast light com­ing in through the win­dows. AWB does a very good job here but is a hint too warm. The cloudy pre­set adds yel­low to com­pen­sate for cloudy light which is blue. In this case it repro­duces too warm. The Incan­des­cent pre­set adds blue to com­pen­sate for incan­des­cent light which is warm. Here it added way too much blue. The cus­tom set­ting, where you take a quick read­ing from a grey card or use a tool like an Expodisc was the most accu­rate and best repro­duced the scene.

Links /resources men­tioned in this podcast:

Spin­rite - To recover crashed hard dri­ves
Allan Lev­ene is run­ning for con­gress!
Grey cards at B&HExpodisc at B&HColor meters at B&H
Pho­tog­ra­phy tours in Mon­treal — One to one pho­tog­ra­phy instruc­tion by yours truly

Wide open aper­ture is our reg­u­lar forum assign­ment for May
– Tex­ture is our level 2 forum assign­ment for May

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :)  Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks to Rob vE, Yise­haq and Robertv in Edin­burgh who posted  blog com­ments about our last pod­cast. Thanks as always to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!

105 — Four tips to improve your bounced flash photography

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #105 offers up tips on how to improve your bounced flash pho­tog­ra­phy. Bounc­ing your flash off of walls and ceil­ings is easy and really soft­ens the light which is often desir­able espe­cially in por­traits. You can also achieve a much more inter­est­ing light­ing pat­tern ver­sus direct on-camera flash. You can often achieve great results with min­i­mal effort and min­i­mal help; I often use bounced flash when I am shoot­ing alone and need a quick light­ing setup.

The images below of my wife Carmy were shot in about 5 min­utes against a slightly green wall in my liv­in­groom. The tones in the face and back­ground wall are sim­i­lar but not iden­ti­cal in all images and I delib­er­ately chose not to match them to see the sub­tle dif­fer­ences. These dif­fer­ences are due to the dif­fer­ent ways that the light bounced around the room. There were win­dows in the room but the day was cloudy and no direct light was shin­ing through the win­dows. Images are unretouched.

Direct flash versus bounced flash

The image on the left shows direct flash. Note the harsh shadow on the wall and the rel­a­tively even light­ing on the face. The shot on the right, bounced the flash off the ceil­ing. The shadow is still on the wall but it is softer. The light­ing pat­tern on the face is less even but more inter­est­ing to the eye.

 

Bounced flash photography

The image on the left used flash that was bounced off of the wall about 12 feet behind me. The image on the right used flash that was bounced off the side wall about 6 feet from me. Note the absence of any shadow on the back wall com­pared to the left image in the first set. When you try this for your­self make note of how far the bounced walls are from your flash. The far­ther the walls are from the flash, the harder the flash has to work and you may need to increase the flash’s output.

 

Links /resources men­tioned in this pod­cast:
Spin­rite - To recover crashed hard dri­ves
Photo pod­cast #4 — Fill flash
Photo pod­cast #47 — Flash sync speeds
Photo pod­cast #71 Portable flash

- Bright Colour is our reg­u­lar forum assign­ment for March
– Sil­hou­ettes is our level 2 forum assign­ment for March

If you liked this pod­cast and want to review it on Itunes, this link gets you to the main page

If you are inter­ested in writ­ing for our blog please con­tact me photography.ca (   A   T  ) G m ail  Dot co m (using stan­dard email formatting)

Please join the Photography.ca fan page on Facebook

My Face­book pro­file — Feel free to “friend” me — please just men­tion Photography.ca
My Twit­ter page — I will fol­low you if you fol­low me — Let’s con­nect — PLEASE email me and tell me who you are in case I don’t rec­i­p­ro­cate because I think you are a spammer.

If you are still lurk­ing on our forum,
feel free to join our friendly :)  Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks to Neil Speers, Stephen Kennedy, Ken Wolter, Jonathan Rams­dell and Allan Lev­ene who posted  blog com­ments about our last pod­cast. Thanks as always to every­one that sent com­ments by email about our last pod­cast. Although ALL com­ments are appre­ci­ated, com­ment­ing directly in this blog is pre­ferred. Thanks as well to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board. Most of the links to actual the prod­ucts are affil­i­ate links that help sup­port this site. Thanks in advance if you pur­chase through those links.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. |Sub­scribe with iTunes|Sub­scribe via RSS feed |Sub­scribe with Google Reader|Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Thanks for lis­ten­ing and keep on shooting!