orthopedic pain management

Lighting round faces — baldness — blemishes — Photography podcast #36

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #36 focuses on think­ing about how dif­fer­ent types of light suit dif­fer­ent types of faces. We talk about how both short light­ing and side light­ing are good for rounder faces. We also talk about blem­ishes and baldness.

Many thanks to Mark McCall for allow­ing me to use this image (and expla­na­tion below the image) clearly show­ing the the slim­ming effect of short light­ing and the broad­en­ing effect of broad light­ing on a model’s face.

Broad Light­ing vs. Short Light­ing
Broad light­ing refers to light­ing up the face from the “broad” side, (widest part of the face from nose to ear from the cam­era angle).
Short light­ing refers to light­ing up the face from the “short” side, (side of the face turned away from the camera)

Short light­ing makes the face appear thin­ner in the image, and is the best choice for most sub­jects. Broad light­ing works best for thin faces.

Thanks as always for the com­ments by Yves Janse and Mikael. We LOVE com­ments and sug­ges­tions so please send more.

Wacom Tablet — anyone got tips?

So I just pur­chased a new Wacom tablet. I heard they rock and make photo edit­ing so much eas­ier. So after wast­ing 1/2 hour installing the fUC@**&%$en!!!!!! dri­ver which did NOT eas­ily install onto my Vista machine…here I go. My first instinct (to be fair after 10 min­utes of use) is that it is NOT as easy to use as every­one raves.

There seems to be an unnat­ural dis­con­nect in my brain between the size of the fixed nib on the pen and the brush size that you choose in pho­to­shop. I guess i will need to play and even check out the tuto­r­ial on the disk. If any­one has any tips or pointers…I’m all ears. Thanks!

Added on Feb. 18, 2007‚ — This com­ment and pic­ture by David Red­ding was really infor­ma­tive so I added it to this main post. Thanks David!

Here is a side by side of one of my touch up jobs. Now all of this could
have been done with a mouse, but I find I can be quite a bit more pre­cise
with the styl­ist. for exam­ple, if you take a look at the fore­head in the
retouched image, even at this web size you can make out skin details (good
luck doing that with a blur mask…I could never fig­ure out how). I am
able to do the touch up and main­tain skin tex­ture by first doing a round
of Cloning and Heal­ing at about 100–200% mag­ni­fi­ca­tion. Once I have
removed all the rather large blem­ishes and skin imper­fec­tions I use the
Brush tool in CS3 with a soft edge, the Pro­tect Tex­ture option in the
brush tool kit selected and an opac­ity of around 20%. I then sam­ple the
skin for colour and just paint on the skin correction.

the biggest dif­fer­ence between the mouse and the styl­ist when doing
edit­ing jobs like this is with the mouse, when using the Brush tool, if
you set the Opac­ity to say 30% (or what ever set­ting) that is what you
get. But, with the styl­ist that same set­ting of 30% is just the max­i­mum,
you can achieve less with the pres­sure of the stylist.

Like I said in my response to you post­ing, the styl­ist does take some
get­ting use to.…How long have you been using a mouse for? But, once you
do get the set­tings to your lik­ing and actu­ally train your brain to use
the styl­ist instead of the mouse you will see how accu­rate you can be with
your editing.

Also, a graph­ics tablet can be a waste of money for some peo­ple. Really,
if all you really do in your edit­ing is crop­ping, curves, colour bal­anc­ing
(in RAW I hope) and sharp­en­ing, then a graph­ics tablet is really a waste
of money. But, on the other hand. If you do a fair amount of touch­ing up
skin, dodg­ing and burn­ing or even cus­tom graph­ics like paint­ing on
pat­terns in you images, then a Tablet could be your sav­ing grace.

Even at the end of the day the ‘machine’ keeps working

Now that I’ve resolved to take my cam­era with me more often, I’m likely to shoot more city scapes…like this one. This is just a small part of the enor­mous Shell refin­ery on the east­ern part of the island Mon­treal. It was a quick shot since the light was fad­ing fast. It was shot at ISO 1000 at 1/80 at F.2.8.

Shots like these tend to bother me some­what. There is a sense of indus­try here. Things are hap­pen­ing. Machines are work­ing. Machines are polluting.

.…..and yet the colours and the con­trast seem intrigu­ing. What do you think?

photograph of refinery

Even at the end of the day the ‘machine’ keeps working

Now that I’ve resolved to take my cam­era with me more often, I’m likely to shoot more city scapes…like this one. This is just a small part of the enor­mous Shell refin­ery on the east­ern part of the island Mon­treal. It was a quick shot since the light was fad­ing fast. It was shot at ISO 1000 at 1/80 at F.2.8.

Shots like these tend to bother me some­what. There is a sense of indus­try here. Things are hap­pen­ing. Machines are work­ing. Machines are polluting.

.…..and yet the colours and the con­trast seem intrigu­ing. What do you think?

photograph of refinery

Clamps, stands, arms and adapters — Photography podcast #35

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #35 is all about using sim­ple acces­sories to make your photo shoots go smoother. In par­tic­u­lar, we dis­cuss clamps, magic arms, flash adapters and light stands. All of the acces­sories can be used in mul­ti­ple ways mak­ing them extremely ver­sa­tile in a vari­ety of shoot­ing situations.

Manfrotto superclamp 035
Man­frotto Super­clamp #035

Manfrotto spring clamp 175F
Man­frotto spring clamp #175 with threaded adapter (088)

Manfrotto spring clamp with flash mount
Man­frotto spring clamp‚#175F with flash mount

Manfrotto magic arm 237HD
Man­frotto flex­i­ble magic arm #237 HD

Opus umbrella mount OPL-SW0316
Opus umbrella mount OPL-SW0316

Opus umbrella mount on manfrotto master stand 004
Opus umbrella mount on man­frotto mas­ter stand #004

Superclamp 035 attached to magic arm attached to springclamp 175
Super­clamp with arm attached to spring clamp

master light stand 004 with arm and superclamp holding a reflector
Extendible arm on man­frotto mas­ter stand #004
attached to super­clamp hold­ing a 32.5 inch reflector

Pur­chas­ing these items through these links helps sup­port this site:

Man­frotto super clamp at B&H
Man­frotto super clamp at Amazon

Man­frotto spring clamp with flash shoe at B&H
Man­frotto spring clamp with flash shoe at Amazon

Manfrotto‚flexible arm‚at B&H
Man­frotto flex­i­ble arm at Amazon

Manfrotto‚master light stand‚at B&H
Man­frotto mas­ter light stand at Amazon

Photoflex (sim­i­lar to‚Opus) umbrella flash mount‚at B&H
Photoflex (sim­i­lar to Opus) umbrella flash mount at Amazon

You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below this set of images.

Photo of the week
This week, the pho­to­graph is by Arkady Renko and I com­ment in the pod­cast on why I think this pho­to­graph is fantastic.

Arkady Renko - Stranger

Thanks as always for the com­ments by‚Samirah,‚ Carl­son Chu and Yves Janse. We LOVE com­ments and sug­ges­tions so please send more. Spe­cial thanks to Nico Pin who has helped make this blog more user friendly and look funkier.

Grab the light now — light waits for no one

Another res­o­lu­tion I am mak­ing this year (start­ing today) is not to tarry when I see great light. Great light doesn’t wait for you, great light doesn’t give a crap about your sched­ule — You wait for great light and when you see it you must grab it by its invis­i­ble balls.

Yes­ter­day was an amaz­ing exam­ple. I woke up and thick fog was every­where — Everywhere!

I LOVE FOG.

For me, fog is great light. It evokes a rare spe­cial mood and feel­ing.
.…but I’m a busy dude and work beck­ons me con­stantly so I checked the win­dow peri­od­i­cally while I waited until I was ready to shoot. Guess what — once I was ready the fog had almost dis­si­pated. Boy was I upset : (

So as a last resort I got into my car and chased the fog until I found the best patch I could find. It was okay fog and I think this self-portrait is not bad.

Point is — Now I have think about what could have been instead of know­ing that I was shoot­ing at the best pos­si­ble time.….

self portrait fog

Bring your camera everywhere — resolutions

It’s so obvi­ous. Just bring your cam­era every­where and you’ll take more pic­tures.
By tak­ing more pic­tures, you’ll learn what works well and what doesn’t.
You won’t regret miss­ing shots.
When you SEE that great light you’ll be there to record it.

So that’s one res­o­lu­tion that I’ll try to stick with this year. I intend to bring my cam­era every­where. (I have a lot of gear so I’m only bring­ing 1 DSLR body, 1 lens and 1 flash)

Another res­o­lu­tion will be to do more reviews. I get a fair amount of email ask­ing me what I use in terms of equip­ment or what I sug­gest. This com­ing year, I intend to share more of what I think are great photo prod­ucts. From photo gear to soft­ware to wires to books — reviews are coming.

Happy new year every­one! All the best for 2008 — Keep on shooting!