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Backdrop

This is a discussion on Backdrop within the Camera equipment & accessories forums, part of the Education & Technical category; I just got a new backdrop yesterday from my "instructor" who is a pro photographer, does anyone have any tips ...

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    Nikki2291 is offline Member
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    Default Backdrop

    I just got a new backdrop yesterday from my "instructor" who is a pro photographer, does anyone have any tips as to using backdrops? I am going to try it out with my kittens as test subjects today but thought I would ask for tips and advice first. I've never used a backdrop before.
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    I'm not exactly sure what you want to know...but....you'll want to light the backdrop with a flash or continuous light source of some kind...
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    tirediron is offline Senior Member
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    A lot has to do with what kind of a backdrop it is; soft cloth, paper, rigid, etc...

    Generally you're going to want to make sure it's smooth (unless it's one that's very specifically meant to be wrinkled like a set of pulled-back window drapes) and that it curves gently from the vertical to the horizontal when it meets the floor. Make sure that your subjects aren't too close; a lot of people have a tendancy to jam the subject right against the backdrop. Make sure there's a couple of feet of separation, and spend lots of time playing with lighting. Your on-camera flash isn't really going to cut it, but you can do a pretty good ad-hoc job with work lights, lamps and paper reflectors.

    Let us know how it works out.

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    Nikki2291 is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by tirediron View Post
    A lot has to do with what kind of a backdrop it is; soft cloth, paper, rigid, etc...

    Generally you're going to want to make sure it's smooth (unless it's one that's very specifically meant to be wrinkled like a set of pulled-back window drapes) and that it curves gently from the vertical to the horizontal when it meets the floor. Make sure that your subjects aren't too close; a lot of people have a tendancy to jam the subject right against the backdrop. Make sure there's a couple of feet of separation, and spend lots of time playing with lighting. Your on-camera flash isn't really going to cut it, but you can do a pretty good ad-hoc job with work lights, lamps and paper reflectors.

    Let us know how it works out.
    I'll let you know how it works out. I'm not sure what kind of material it is made out of, but it's anti-reflective so that the light doesn't reflect back at me. My flash doesn't cut really, your right, I'm going to try and get some studio lights.
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    Alienbees makes some interesting and very affordable flash-heads if you are interested.
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