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Detail and Color contrast

This is a discussion on Detail and Color contrast within the Lighting forums, part of the Education & Technical category; Hi All, Could someone tell me how you can get a color contrast like this photo vs what my photos ...

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    Yisehaq's Avatar
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    Default Detail and Color contrast

    Hi All,
    Could someone tell me how you can get a color contrast like this photo vs what my photos usually look like. How can I get portraits with details like the first one? Is it possible to change the second shot to the coloration and contrast of the first one? (I hope it makes sense)

    Can anyone be kind enough to demonerate the technique?
    Thanks

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    Marko's Avatar
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    Hi Yisehaq,

    What you are asking is how to fix a photo where little attention was paid to the lighting in order to emulate a photo with great lighting. very difficult.

    IMO, this is the wrong approach and not the best investment of your time.

    Much better - is to try and emulate the actual lighting in camera. This allows you to "see". Go out and try to copy this lighting style a few times IN CAMERA...once you do, then you can reproduce this anytime.

    Yaqub's photo has soft light Coming from the left
    Your shot looks like direct flash that wasn't strong enough taken in harsh light. (please let me know if that is correct)

    I'd practice with natural night first plus (possibly a reflector - depends how much natural reflectivity is in the environment ie light concrete or walls can act as natural reflectors) to try to emulate Yaqub's image.

    Hope that helps
    Marko
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    Yisehaq's Avatar
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    Thanks Marko for the explanation,
    Quote Originally Posted by Marko View Post
    Yaqub's photo has soft light Coming from the left
    Your shot looks like direct flash that wasn't strong enough taken in harsh light. (please let me know if that is correct)
    Marko
    Yeah, mine is taken in a harsh midday sun with a built-in flash used as fill-in.
    In fact, I wasn't trying to convert my photo to Yaqub's style but trying to learn what Yaqub did and compare to my skills . I thought that is one way of going forward.


    Anyways, I have taken your advice well.
    Quote Originally Posted by Marko View Post
    practice with natural night first plus (possibly a reflector - depends how much natural reflectivity is in the environment ie light concrete or walls can act as natural reflectors) to try to emulate Yaqub's image.
    Marko
    hope to come back with such a photo soon.

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    Cool - look forward to it.

    To emulate Yaqub's photo look for the softer light that he used.
    Stay away from (or TAME...by letting it bounce or diffuse it) direct harsh light.....it's terrible for learning what you are trying to emulate. It's great for other stuff, but one step at a time. You seem to like portraits...learn soft lighting first and you'll be happier.

    Lighting really is everything in photography...
    Post processing is a jillion times easier when the lighting is right.

    Hope that helps - Marko
    - Please connect with me further
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    "You have to milk the cow quite a lot, and get plenty of milk to get a little cheese." Henri Cartier-Bresson from The Decisive Moment.

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