orthopedic pain management

Want a Higher ISO? Expect more Noise.

The bois­ter­ous gen­eral opin­ion on Higher ISOs is just that — noisy.

The higher the ISO when tak­ing pho­tographs with your SLR, the more noise it cre­ates. So all of the efforts we make try­ing to tweak and adjust our cam­eras for that per­fect light­ing, coun­ter­acts with the clar­ity of the photograph.

Thus, here is our plea to the cam­era man­u­fac­tur­ers: We have suf­fi­cient mega pix­els, we cer­tainly don’t need more (Since that is what seems cam­era man­u­fac­tur­ers are giv­ing us nowa­days‚¦). Instead why not give us bet­ter low light/noise performance?

It should be noted that some pho­tog­ra­phers, espe­cially fine art pho­tog­ra­phers, can use noise to their advan­tage in order to cre­ate a cer­tain feel. For the most part though, most pho­tog­ra­phers hate noise.

Pho­tog­ra­phy forum link: http://www.photography.ca/Forums/showthread.php?t=1916

A Mad Moment — Having Fun at Ph.ca — Mad Aussie

Gid­day again to another lit­tle ‘Mad Moment’

Pho­tog­ra­phy can be a daunt­ing sub­ject to learn, espe­cially for those at the very begin­ning of the learn­ing curve. Aper­tures, f-stops, depth of field, lead­ing lines, neg­a­tive space, ISO, modes, poses, pan­ning, HDR, it just goes on and on. It can get a lit­tle frus­trat­ing at times I know.

But Photography.ca is about mak­ing learn­ing eas­ier, and, more impor­tantly to me, mak­ing it more fun also! I don’t do too many things that I don’t find fun. And if it wasn’t fun at Photography.ca … I wouldn’t ‘do’ that either! If you’ve been lis­ten­ing to Marko’s pod­casts then you’ll agree that they have a flavour, a feel, an energy, that just screams out “relax … sit down … enjoy! Eat me out of house and home just don’t kick my dog!!”‚ This is some­thing I find lack­ing in most other pod­casts on pho­tog­ra­phy. I don’t fall asleep lis­ten­ing to Marko! :)

But are the forums here the same as most forums? Or do they also have a life of their own?
So many forums are uptight and so proper that you are afraid to slide into its cyber-lounge and kick your shoes off for fear of some forum cop run­ning over, beat­ing you with his forum trun­cheon, and read­ing you some forum riot act!

Well … pol­ish up your funny bones, rub some mois­tur­izer into your smi­ley mus­cles, and pull out your sense of‚ humour and stroke it awhile, cause here at Photography.ca we encour­age some lev­ity and joy. All we ask is that our mem­bers show respect to each other where appro­pri­ate and don’t sti­fle someone’s thread with jokes if they haven’t yet got the answers they seek.

So … Fun with Pho­tog­ra­phy. There’s many ways to do this and, of course, these ways can vary per­son to person.

My ‘Mad Moment’ today will focus on sim­ply look­ing for the lev­ity in your pho­tos and shar­ing those. You may have a photo that doesn’t really come up to any great tech­ni­cal level but it cer­tainly has an amuse­ment value.

The fol­low­ing thread links will show what I like to do with pho­tos like this. Enjoy and we hope to see you join in and learn with us.

Forum Threads
Does my ass look big to you?

I Quit! Life’s Too Hard!

For Sale — Going Cheep

By Mad Aussie — Photography.ca blog con­trib­u­tor & forum mem­ber
www.astrovisual.com.au
www.astrovisualphotography.com.au
www.istockimages.com.au

Why is the snow grey? What happened?

Thanks to casil403 of our pho­tog­ra­phy forum for the use of these pics. So what hap­pened here? Why is the snow grey when every­one knows that snow is white.

Basic expo­sure is a com­mon area of con­fu­sion for new­com­ers in pho­tog­ra­phy and these pho­tos are PERFECT teach­ing tools.So what hap­pened here? Why is the snow grey(ish) — after all, the pho­tog­ra­pher used a cam­era meter right?

Grey snow

Grey snow

Here is why this shot did not come out. This is text­book basic expo­sure and you NEED to under­stand this if you want the fog to lift and move up a level with your pho­tog­ra­phy.‚ Here goes:

All a cam­era is, is hole with a flap over it. When the flap is lifted light hits film or a sen­sor. On mod­ern cam­eras, depend­ing on the set­ting you use, the camera’s meter sug­gests an expo­sure. This sug­ges­tion is good one in the fol­low­ing con­di­tion;

– When there is a good rep­re­sen­ta­tion of light and dark tones. This is called a nor­mal scene.

AT THIS POINT WE MUST SAY THAT THE CAMERA IS BLIND. IT DOES NOT KNOW WHAT IT IS LOOKING AT BECAUSE IT HAS NO BRAIN. ALL IT DOES IS AVERAGE OUT THE TONES IT SEES AND SPITS OUT AN EXPOSURE. ALTHOUGH THIS IS NOT INTUITIVE (FOR COLOUR PHOTOGRAPHY) THE COLOUR MID-GREY IS THAT MIDDLE TONE THAT THE CAMERA USES AS THE AVERAGE.

Since these shots above have a pre­pon­der­ance of white highly reflec­tive snow and NOT enough other tones to bal­ance out the scene, This is NOT a nor­mal scene. The camera’s meter there­fore, will NOT be accu­rate in cases like this (even if your cam­era costs 3,000‚ or 10,000 dol­lars) and if you use the camera’s meter read­ing in this case you will NEVER EVER get white snow. You have to make adjust­ments to the meter’s read­ing. This is why a mon­key can take a pic­ture, but not a good picture.

In this case, what the cam­era is doing is say­ing “Holy crap bat­man, look at all that white snow, it’s so bright; I bet­ter CUT the expo­sure to bal­ance out the scene”. That’s what the meter does here — It tells the cam­era to cut the expo­sure and so it is too dark. To rem­edy this you need to give the scene MORE light by increas­ing the expo­sure by 1 to 2 stops.

The exact oppo­site is true as well. Let’s say you have a white dog on black pave­ment or just a shot of black pave­ment. In that case the camera’s meter will say “Holy crap bat­man, look at all that black pave­ment , it’s so dark; I bet­ter INCREASE the expo­sure to bal­ance out the scene”. And in that case as well, the black pave­ment will look grey because the meter is try­ing to aver­age out the tones in the scene toward mid-grey. To rem­edy this you need to give the scene LESS light by decreas­ing the expo­sure by 1 to 2 stops.

I hope that made sense. You can fol­low the whole thread (topic) here on our pho­tog­ra­phy forum and read the advice of dif­fer­ent mem­bers. If you still have ques­tions, join for free and post in that thread (or start a new one). It’s our plea­sure to help.

63 — Review of the Colormunki and the i1XTreme

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #63 fea­tures a review of the Col­or­munki and the i1XTreme monitor/printer/projector pro­fil­ing sys­tems. These are hard­ware sys­tems that use a spec­tropho­tome­ter to mea­sure the color from hard­ware devices like mon­i­tors, print­ers, pro­jec­tors (and in the case of the i1XTreme, scan­ners and cam­eras as well). So many of us are print­ing from our homes, offices or home-offices and we want accu­rate colours from our RGB or CMYK print­ers. These hard­ware devices absolutely sim­plify this extremely con­fus­ing process and both prod­ucts come highly rec­om­mended. After the review, we ask Joe Brady of MAC­grou­pUS in a tele­phone inter­view, to clar­ify what we need to do in Photoshop’s print­ing dia­logue boxes to assure us of a good mon­i­tor to printer print. This is a com­mon area of con­fu­sion for many pho­tog­ra­phers try­ing to print on their own printers.

UPDATE — In the pod­cast I say that the Col­or­Munki is restricted to use on 3 mon­i­tors. This restric­tion has been lifted.

The ColorMunki

The Col­or­Munki

i1Xtreme

i1Xtreme

Photoshops dialogue boxes

Photoshop’s dia­logue boxes

Links men­tioned in this pod­cast:
col­or­munki
i1XTREME

Col­or­Munki sum­mary tuto­r­ial on Youtube

X-rite Eye One ( i1 ) 1 of 2 — Mon­i­tor Setup from colorHQ.com
X-rite Eye One ( i1 ) 2 of 2 — Mon­i­tor Adjust­ments from colorHQ.com
Pod­cast #62 — Mon­i­tor — printer cal­i­bra­tion (an intro­duc­tion) — Inter­view with Joe Brady
Pur­chase the col­or­Munki at B&H — Pur­chase the i1XTreme at B&H (what I reviewed) Pur­chase the i1 Photo at B&H (a good alter­na­tive if you don’t need the extra bells and whis­tles).
Joe Brady Photography

Link I for­got to men­tion — Just like there are bet­ter mon­i­tors for pho­tog­ra­phy, there are bet­ter print­ers with good print dri­vers that work well with the 2 sys­tems reviewed in this pod­cast. 2 rec­om­mended print­ers Epson R1900 and Epson R2880 at B&H

If you are still lurk­ing, feel free to join our friendly :) Pho­tog­ra­phy forum

Thanks as always to Steven K, benny, Lovin and SuzieQ who posted a blog com­ment about our last pod­cast and to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. I Sub­scribe with iTunes I Sub­scribe via RSS feed I Sub­scribe with Google Reader I Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.

Another ‘Mad Moment’ — Self Improvement — by Mad Aussie

G’day once more Photography.ca fans.

Another week flashes by, and the Photography.ca forums have hus­tled and bus­tled along quite nicely as usual lately. Lots of new peo­ple join­ing in the fun and learn­ing which is great to see!

My ‘Mad Moment’ this time around is on ‘Self Improve­ment’ and we have two threads in the forum (one by raiven and one by Greg Nus­pel) that dis­cuss this sub­ject. Do you go out to shoot a mas­ter­piece but return with a piece of some­thing else? Do you feel like you are doing every­thing you can to cre­ate a work of art and only end up with some­thing that rhymes with art? Yeh, we all do that sometimes.

So then, how do you go about lift­ing your pho­tog­ra­phy skills? Are there reg­u­lar ways and tech­niques one might apply to their weekly pho­tog­ra­phy that might advance their skills? Can you pro­duce bet­ter images on a more reg­u­lar basis? Well, quite a few of the Photography.ca mem­bers seem to have var­i­ous ideas on this sub­ject so fol­low the two links below to read about how you can learn from them.

Even bet­ter, join the forums if you haven’t already and explore ALL the ways you can learn inter­ac­tively with Marko and the Photography.ca members.

Forum Threads
Improv­ing One’s Pho­tog­ra­phy
Self Improve­ment Assignments

By Mad Aussie — Photography.ca blog con­trib­u­tor & forum mem­ber
www.astrovisual.com.au
www.astrovisualphotography.com.au
www.istockimages.com.au

Another ‘Mad Moment’ — Self Improvement — by Mad Aussie

G’day once more Photography.ca fans.

Another week flashes by, and the Photography.ca forums have hus­tled and bus­tled along quite nicely as usual lately. Lots of new peo­ple join­ing in the fun and learn­ing which is great to see!

My ‘Mad Moment’ this time around is on ‘Self Improve­ment’ and we have two threads in the forum (one by raiven and one by Greg Nus­pel) that dis­cuss this sub­ject. Do you go out to shoot a mas­ter­piece but return with a piece of some­thing else? Do you feel like you are doing every­thing you can to cre­ate a work of art and only end up with some­thing that rhymes with art? Yeh, we all do that sometimes.

So then, how do you go about lift­ing your pho­tog­ra­phy skills? Are there reg­u­lar ways and tech­niques one might apply to their weekly pho­tog­ra­phy that might advance their skills? Can you pro­duce bet­ter images on a more reg­u­lar basis? Well, quite a few of the Photography.ca mem­bers seem to have var­i­ous ideas on this sub­ject so fol­low the two links below to read about how you can learn from them.

Even bet­ter, join the forums if you haven’t already and explore ALL the ways you can learn inter­ac­tively with Marko and the Photography.ca members.

Forum Threads
Improv­ing One’s Pho­tog­ra­phy
Self Improve­ment Assignments

By Mad Aussie — Photography.ca blog con­trib­u­tor & forum mem­ber
www.astrovisual.com.au
www.astrovisualphotography.com.au
www.istockimages.com.au

Program modes — A ‘Mad’ Moment by Mad Aussie

Hello Photography.ca fans, mem­bers and lurk­ers.
Our forums here are a very con­struc­tive way to help move your pho­tog­ra­phy for­ward in a pos­i­tive man­ner and within the forums, blog entries and pod­casts, you can find a vari­ety of means to suit you and your cur­rent level of pho­tog­ra­phy skill and interest.

A cool exam­ple of this, and my ‘moment’ for today is a thread in the forums which asks a ques­tion and the rea­son for why one answered as they did.

The ques­tion is ‘What Mode Do You Use?’

Many pho­tog­ra­phers ignore many of the options avail­able to them and many of us are unaware of how some of these modes can ben­e­fit us in spe­cific ways. Learn­ing what modes peo­ple are using on their cam­eras and for what sit­u­a­tions they employ these modes goes a long way to help­ing us under­stand­ing how we can ben­e­fit also.

To visit the thread of my ‘moment’ fol­low me HERE

Mad Aussie — Photography.ca blog con­trib­u­tor & forum mem­ber
www.astrovisual.com.au
www.astrovisualphotography.com.au
www.istockimages.com.au

Program modes — A ‘Mad’ Moment by Mad Aussie

Hello Photography.ca fans, mem­bers and lurk­ers.
Our forums here are a very con­struc­tive way to help move your pho­tog­ra­phy for­ward in a pos­i­tive man­ner and within the forums, blog entries and pod­casts, you can find a vari­ety of means to suit you and your cur­rent level of pho­tog­ra­phy skill and interest.

A cool exam­ple of this, and my ‘moment’ for today is a thread in the forums which asks a ques­tion and the rea­son for why one answered as they did.

The ques­tion is ‘What Mode Do You Use?’

Many pho­tog­ra­phers ignore many of the options avail­able to them and many of us are unaware of how some of these modes can ben­e­fit us in spe­cific ways. Learn­ing what modes peo­ple are using on their cam­eras and for what sit­u­a­tions they employ these modes goes a long way to help­ing us under­stand­ing how we can ben­e­fit also.

To visit the thread of my ‘moment’ fol­low me HERE

Mad Aussie — Photography.ca blog con­trib­u­tor & forum mem­ber
www.astrovisual.com.au
www.astrovisualphotography.com.au
www.istockimages.com.au

Photography.ca winning member images

For the past 2 months we have added a new fea­ture on our pho­tog­ra­phy bul­letin board where the Admin on Photography.ca (Me, Marko),‚ chooses 1 photo that he thinks is great and talks about the photo. The Eagle photo below by kentw was my choice for this month. (check the pre­vi­ous link for the explanation).

We have lots of pho­tographs being sub­mit­ted each month on our forum for cri­tiques, assign­ments or just to show the photo. Choos­ing Kent’s photo as the ‘win­ner’ took about 3.5 hours of care­ful sift­ing. Given that it took so long to choose, I came across many many many close con­tenders. Seems like a waste of time just to include 1 photo so I’d like to include 3 hon­ourable men­tions right here.

If you haven’t joined our forum I would encour­age you to do so. We are an extremely friendly bunch that share and learn daily.

Here’s the win­ning photo:

Eagles on the Mississippi by kentw

Eagles on the Mis­sis­sippi by kentw

Here are the 3 hon­ourable mentions:

A leaf in water by Michaelaw

A leaf in water by Michaelaw

From Exploring b/w thread by Mad Aussie

From ‘Explor­ing b/w thread’ by Mad Aussie

Shot of my dd...by ~Carla~

Shot of my dd…by ~Carla~

62 — Monitor — printer calibration — Interview with Joe Brady

Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast #62 fea­tures an intro­duc­tion into mon­i­tor cal­i­bra­tion and pro­fil­ing and printer cal­i­bra­tion and pro­fil­ing by way of an inter­view with Joe Brady of MAC­grou­pUS. Joe clears up many com­mon ques­tions that we have when it comes to mon­i­tor pro­fil­ing and tells us straight up why hard­ware devices that pro­file your mon­i­tor are vastly supe­rior to the pro­fil­ing soft­ware that comes with mon­i­tors. We talk about colour space, ICC pro­files and how (unfor­tu­nately) the aver­age pho­tog­ra­pher is using a bad mon­i­tor and a flawed work­flow to proof their work. The next pod­cast will fea­ture a full review of the col­or­munki and i1XTreme hard­ware pro­fil­ing devices gra­ciously loaned to me by MACgroupUS.

This image is just to illus­trate a point. On the left is an image off of an UNcal­i­brated Eizo Mon­i­tor. On the right is that same image on a mid-range mon­i­tor that I thought was some­what cal­i­brated. Side by side you can see how the Eizo has a greater tonal range and less of a cast. The results are WAY more dra­matic when you see the result­ing prints with your eyes. When you actu­ally cal­i­brate and pro­file the mon­i­tor using qual­ity cal­i­bra­tion hard­ware, you get the best (or close to the best) result that the par­tic­u­lar mon­i­tor can deliver. This usu­ally trans­lates to a wider tonal range with whites being whiter and blacks cast free as well, com­pared to the pre-calibrated monitor.

Links men­tioned in this podcast:

col­or­munki
i1XTREME
col­or­munki train­ing — Videos on using color munki along with color the­ory
Guess what it is thread

Assign­ments on our pho­tog­ra­phy bul­letin board:
March 2009 Photo Assign­ment — Wind
March 2009 — Assign­ment — pho­tograph­ing words — Wind

Thanks as always to Susan, Steven K, Jla­bel, Kent Wil­son and Tony who posted a blog com­ment about our last pod­cast and to all the new mem­bers of the bul­letin board.

If you are look­ing at this mate­r­ial on any other site except Photography.ca — Please hop on over to the Photography.ca blog and pod­cast and get this and other pho­tog­ra­phy info directly from the source. I Sub­scribe with iTunes I Sub­scribe via RSS feed I Sub­scribe with Google Reader I Sub­scribe for free to the Pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast — Photography.ca and get all the posts/podcasts by Email
You can down­load this pho­tog­ra­phy pod­cast directly by click­ing the pre­ced­ing link or lis­ten to it almost imme­di­ately with the embed­ded player below.